Cover image for Leaving another kingdom : selected poems
Title:
Leaving another kingdom : selected poems
Author:
Stern, Gerald, 1925-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Harper & Row, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
ix, 246 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780060551872

9780060964559
Format :
Book

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PS3569.T3888 A6 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Author Notes

Often applauded as a modern Walt Whitman, Gerald Stern was born February 22, 1925 in Pittsburgh. Stern grew up in Pittsburgh and received a BA in 1947 from the University of Pittsburgh and an M.A from Columbia University in 1949. He did post-graduate study at the University of Paris from 1949 to 1950 and taught at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Temple University, University of Pittsburgh, University of Iowa, Columbia, New York University, and Princeton. He held chairs at Washington University at St. Louis, Bucknell, and The University of Alabama. He has been a member of the University of Iowa Writer's Workshop in Iowa City since 1982.

Stern is the author of 12 collections of poetry including Leaving Another Kingdom: Selected Poems, Bread Without Sugar and Odd Mercy. His work is anthologized in more than 50 anthologies of American poetry. His long poem "Hot Dog " from Odd Mercy was published in a special supplement to The American Poetry Review in 1995. His work has received numerous awards including the Patterson Poetry Prize, the PEN Award, the Jerome J. Shestack Poetry Prize, the Melville Caine Award from the Poetry Society of America, The Lamont Poetry Prize, and the Fellowship of the Academy of American Poets for Distinguished Lifetime Service. He has also received a Guggenheim fellowship and three National Endowment for the Arts grants.

Gerald Stern married Patricia Miller on September 12, 1952 and they have two children, Rachael and David. They were subsequently divorced.

(Bowker Author Biography) Gerald Stern lives in Lambertville, New Jersey.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Often applauded as a modern Walt Whitman, Gerald Stern was born February 22, 1925 in Pittsburgh. Stern grew up in Pittsburgh and received a BA in 1947 from the University of Pittsburgh and an M.A from Columbia University in 1949. He did post-graduate study at the University of Paris from 1949 to 1950 and taught at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Temple University, University of Pittsburgh, University of Iowa, Columbia, New York University, and Princeton. He held chairs at Washington University at St. Louis, Bucknell, and The University of Alabama. He has been a member of the University of Iowa Writer's Workshop in Iowa City since 1982.

Stern is the author of 12 collections of poetry including Leaving Another Kingdom: Selected Poems, Bread Without Sugar and Odd Mercy. His work is anthologized in more than 50 anthologies of American poetry. His long poem "Hot Dog " from Odd Mercy was published in a special supplement to The American Poetry Review in 1995. His work has received numerous awards including the Patterson Poetry Prize, the PEN Award, the Jerome J. Shestack Poetry Prize, the Melville Caine Award from the Poetry Society of America, The Lamont Poetry Prize, and the Fellowship of the Academy of American Poets for Distinguished Lifetime Service. He has also received a Guggenheim fellowship and three National Endowment for the Arts grants.

Gerald Stern married Patricia Miller on September 12, 1952 and they have two children, Rachael and David. They were subsequently divorced.

(Bowker Author Biography) Gerald Stern lives in Lambertville, New Jersey.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

There are several reasons why Gerald Stern is one of the most admired of contemporary American poets, and this selection of his work over 20 years bears testimony to them. Item: his biblical verse form--long unenjambed lines filled with repetition. Instance: "I will give you Sappho / preparing herself for the wind; / I will give you Voltaire / walking in the snow." Item: his incredible ability to capture fiercely emotional states without being maudlin. Instance: "I am going to be unappeased at the opossum's death / I am not going to stand in a wet ditch / with the Toyotas and the Chevies passing over me / at sixty miles an hour / and praise the beauty and the balance / and lose myself in the immortal lifestream." Item: his vast arrogance tempered with real humility. Instance: "I am studying paradise and the hereafter, / a life beyond compare, / a great log thrown up for my own pleasure, / an unbelievably large and cold and beneficent sun." How can you resist a poet like this? Don't try. --Pat Monaghan


Publisher's Weekly Review

Lax editing of this hefty collection, whose entries span 15 years, obscures the poetic sensibility of an accomplished writer; a profusion of second-rate efforts clouds the exceptional works included here. Stern's ( Lovesick ) candor fizzles into coziness (``I love the cows best when they are a few feet away'' in ``Cow Worship''; ``I love the sight of me / rolled over on the ground'' in ``Song''; ``I sat on my porch trying to make up my mind / about the Pablo Picasso I love the most'' in ``The Picasso Poem''; ``I still love Schubert /most of all'' in ``Stopping Schubert''). The density of allusions to philosophers, artists and other poets creates a rarefied, even clubby tone. Readers undeterred by the lack of pruning, however, will be rewarded by poems like ``Another Insane Devotion''--empathetic forays into the contradictions within nature, art, the self, relationships that are delicately sustained and beautifully nuanced. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

The cumulative effect of Stern's thought makes this substantial collection worth reading. Confidentially addressing the reader in long, expansive, Whitmanesque lines, his longer poems are the most successful. Stern ( Paradise Poems , LJ 8/84; Lovesick , LJ 9/1/87) goes on an unending quest to understand the kalei doscopic mystery of individual experience: the beloved woman he did not marry, the search for justice, the mo ments of intense joy from nature and books, the sadness of life. His America is populated less by cultural landmarks than by grief and loss: ``in America, all that richness, all that Utopia, wasted''; in rotting Lambertville, New Jersey, people walk ``past abandoned factories and wooden garages/ . . . to stinking New Hope, where all their deep longing/ is reduced to an hour and a half of greedy buying.'' As with all long collec tions, this one is uneven, but honest, ambitious, and recommended.-- Bettina Drew, City Coll., CUNY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

There are several reasons why Gerald Stern is one of the most admired of contemporary American poets, and this selection of his work over 20 years bears testimony to them. Item: his biblical verse form--long unenjambed lines filled with repetition. Instance: "I will give you Sappho / preparing herself for the wind; / I will give you Voltaire / walking in the snow." Item: his incredible ability to capture fiercely emotional states without being maudlin. Instance: "I am going to be unappeased at the opossum's death / I am not going to stand in a wet ditch / with the Toyotas and the Chevies passing over me / at sixty miles an hour / and praise the beauty and the balance / and lose myself in the immortal lifestream." Item: his vast arrogance tempered with real humility. Instance: "I am studying paradise and the hereafter, / a life beyond compare, / a great log thrown up for my own pleasure, / an unbelievably large and cold and beneficent sun." How can you resist a poet like this? Don't try. --Pat Monaghan


Publisher's Weekly Review

Lax editing of this hefty collection, whose entries span 15 years, obscures the poetic sensibility of an accomplished writer; a profusion of second-rate efforts clouds the exceptional works included here. Stern's ( Lovesick ) candor fizzles into coziness (``I love the cows best when they are a few feet away'' in ``Cow Worship''; ``I love the sight of me / rolled over on the ground'' in ``Song''; ``I sat on my porch trying to make up my mind / about the Pablo Picasso I love the most'' in ``The Picasso Poem''; ``I still love Schubert /most of all'' in ``Stopping Schubert''). The density of allusions to philosophers, artists and other poets creates a rarefied, even clubby tone. Readers undeterred by the lack of pruning, however, will be rewarded by poems like ``Another Insane Devotion''--empathetic forays into the contradictions within nature, art, the self, relationships that are delicately sustained and beautifully nuanced. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

The cumulative effect of Stern's thought makes this substantial collection worth reading. Confidentially addressing the reader in long, expansive, Whitmanesque lines, his longer poems are the most successful. Stern ( Paradise Poems , LJ 8/84; Lovesick , LJ 9/1/87) goes on an unending quest to understand the kalei doscopic mystery of individual experience: the beloved woman he did not marry, the search for justice, the mo ments of intense joy from nature and books, the sadness of life. His America is populated less by cultural landmarks than by grief and loss: ``in America, all that richness, all that Utopia, wasted''; in rotting Lambertville, New Jersey, people walk ``past abandoned factories and wooden garages/ . . . to stinking New Hope, where all their deep longing/ is reduced to an hour and a half of greedy buying.'' As with all long collec tions, this one is uneven, but honest, ambitious, and recommended.-- Bettina Drew, City Coll., CUNY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.