Cover image for The Elderly : opposing viewpoints
Title:
The Elderly : opposing viewpoints
Author:
Swisher, Karin, 1966-
Publication Information:
San Diego, CA : Greenhaven Press, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
216 pages ; 22 cm.
Summary:
Various authors debate age-related issues: How does society view the elderly? Do the elderly need outside help? Is social security distributed fairly? and Can society meet the elderly's health care needs?
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780899084756

9780899084503
Format :
Book

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HQ1061 .E375 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Summary

Summary

Various authors debate age-related issues: How does society view the elderly? Do the elderly need outside help? Is social security distributed fairly? and Can society meet the elderly's health care needs?


Summary

Various authors debate age-related issues: How does society view the elderly? Do the elderly need outside help? Is social security distributed fairly? and Can society meet the elderly's health care needs?


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Are the elderly greedy? Do they demand too big a share of society's resources? Dealing with a subject much neglected in YA nonfiction, the articles in this collection debate controversial emotional issues about society's responsibility for the old. One politician sees it as a simple old-versus-young struggle for limited resources. Others warn that it's discriminatory to scapegoat the elderly and that society must care for all the poor, old and young. The opposing viewpoints are organized into sections that confront whether the elderly are poor, whether they need Social Security and Medicare, what to do about their health care (including the issue of national insurance and the role of nursing homes), and how we view the elderly. As always in this fine series, current book and periodical bibliographies will stimulate further research, and there's a list of organizations to contact and an index. Gr. 9-12. --Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

Three well-balanced presentations. America's Future explores contemporary issues in a lively but substantive fashion, and the topics covered are sure to engender debate among teenagers. The Elderly addresses the needs and financial standing of this rapidly growing segment of American society. The politically explosive topic of national health care is given a balanced presentation. Violence in America seeks not to settle the questions regarding our violent society, but to present a forum for their debate. Clever political cartoons reprinted from newspapers are interspersed within the texts. Social-studies students will be well versed in these issues after reading the short essays; seasoned world watchers will find new materials to ponder. --Dorothy J. Coakley, San Francisco Pub . Lib . (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Are the elderly greedy? Do they demand too big a share of society's resources? Dealing with a subject much neglected in YA nonfiction, the articles in this collection debate controversial emotional issues about society's responsibility for the old. One politician sees it as a simple old-versus-young struggle for limited resources. Others warn that it's discriminatory to scapegoat the elderly and that society must care for all the poor, old and young. The opposing viewpoints are organized into sections that confront whether the elderly are poor, whether they need Social Security and Medicare, what to do about their health care (including the issue of national insurance and the role of nursing homes), and how we view the elderly. As always in this fine series, current book and periodical bibliographies will stimulate further research, and there's a list of organizations to contact and an index. Gr. 9-12. --Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

Three well-balanced presentations. America's Future explores contemporary issues in a lively but substantive fashion, and the topics covered are sure to engender debate among teenagers. The Elderly addresses the needs and financial standing of this rapidly growing segment of American society. The politically explosive topic of national health care is given a balanced presentation. Violence in America seeks not to settle the questions regarding our violent society, but to present a forum for their debate. Clever political cartoons reprinted from newspapers are interspersed within the texts. Social-studies students will be well versed in these issues after reading the short essays; seasoned world watchers will find new materials to ponder. --Dorothy J. Coakley, San Francisco Pub . Lib . (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.