Cover image for Caribbean canvas
Title:
Caribbean canvas
Author:
Lessac, Frané.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First American edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Lippincott, 1989.

©1987
Physical Description:
24 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 31 cm
Summary:
The artwork of Frané Lessac accompanies this collection of poems by various Caribbean poets, including Robert Johnson, Edward Brathwaite, A.L. Hendricks, Evan Jones, and others.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780397323678

9780397323685
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
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ND315.L47 L42 1987 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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ND315.L47 L42 1987 Adult Non-Fiction Oversize
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Summary

Summary

A shining collection of paintings that display the magic of the Caribbean. Warm, salty breezes, turquoise waters, limbo dancing, and busy marketplaces are some examples of the sights to be viewed. 21 full-color illustrations."


Summary

The artwork of Frane Lessac accompanies this collection of poems by various Caribbean poets, including Robert Johnson, Edward Brathwaite, A.L. Hendricks, Evan Jones, and others.


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Gr. 2-4, younger for reading aloud. A sampling of poetry and Lessac's idiosyncratic paintings is blended into a flavorful evocation of life in the Caribbean islands. The poems and proverbs included seem almost an afterthought to the striking illustrations, which, through brown faces, neon colors, and assorted scenes of buildings, beaches, and people, suggest both the joy and the harsher realities of tropical life. Island patois is preserved in the poems and sayings, and although interpretations are provided where the dialect is thick, there are no notes commenting on the scenes or vocabulary, a regrettable omission. In areas where children are unfamiliar with the culture portrayed, adults will need to provide background. However, each painting's name is given as well as its setting, medium, and size, making this book a splendid asset for art classes and a vivid support for classroom units on the Caribbean. --Denise Wilms


Publisher's Weekly Review

Lessac ( My Little Island ) has paired 19 West Indian poems and proverbs with her strong, lyrical paintings to evoke Caribbean island life. Framed by lush tropical plants, a policeman rides his bicycle, while in Mr. T's barbershop, a man gets a trim, and is admonished to ``live in de cement house, and no worry de hurricane.'' In St. Kitts, ``with swinging hips and steady stride,'' market women ``bring baskets down, / To feed the hungry town.'' Rendered in a flat, primitive style, Lessac's cheerfully folksy portraits--of teeming tropical fish, a vivid pink church--are the book's focus. And while aptly invoking native cadences, the poems are a sometimes uneasy balance of colloquial voices and others, more studied, from the American poetic establishment. All ages. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-- Lessac's new title is as exquisite as her My Little Island (Lippincott, 1985). In this beautiful collection, she has compiled some wonderful poems by well-known West Indian poets such as Evan Jones, Susan J. Wallace, Edward Brathwaite, etc. She also includes some original West Indian proverbs, such as ``You live in de cement house, and no worry de hurricane.'' Each poem or proverb is matched with one of Lessac's bright, vivid paintings depicting life throughout the islands of the Caribbean. The combination of the two makes this book a real jewel. The text is descriptive of different aspects of West Indian culture; although the language used is in an English dialect, it is understandable. In addition, a few of the proverbs written in another dialect have been translated into English. The West Indies come alive in these pages through the extraordinary color contrasts in the paintings and the precise details of the West Indian landscape. This book, which will serve as a read-aloud or read-alone, will be a great addition to any library collection serving children.-- Lucrece Louisdhon-Walter, Queens Borough Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 2-4, younger for reading aloud. A sampling of poetry and Lessac's idiosyncratic paintings is blended into a flavorful evocation of life in the Caribbean islands. The poems and proverbs included seem almost an afterthought to the striking illustrations, which, through brown faces, neon colors, and assorted scenes of buildings, beaches, and people, suggest both the joy and the harsher realities of tropical life. Island patois is preserved in the poems and sayings, and although interpretations are provided where the dialect is thick, there are no notes commenting on the scenes or vocabulary, a regrettable omission. In areas where children are unfamiliar with the culture portrayed, adults will need to provide background. However, each painting's name is given as well as its setting, medium, and size, making this book a splendid asset for art classes and a vivid support for classroom units on the Caribbean. --Denise Wilms


Publisher's Weekly Review

Lessac ( My Little Island ) has paired 19 West Indian poems and proverbs with her strong, lyrical paintings to evoke Caribbean island life. Framed by lush tropical plants, a policeman rides his bicycle, while in Mr. T's barbershop, a man gets a trim, and is admonished to ``live in de cement house, and no worry de hurricane.'' In St. Kitts, ``with swinging hips and steady stride,'' market women ``bring baskets down, / To feed the hungry town.'' Rendered in a flat, primitive style, Lessac's cheerfully folksy portraits--of teeming tropical fish, a vivid pink church--are the book's focus. And while aptly invoking native cadences, the poems are a sometimes uneasy balance of colloquial voices and others, more studied, from the American poetic establishment. All ages. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-- Lessac's new title is as exquisite as her My Little Island (Lippincott, 1985). In this beautiful collection, she has compiled some wonderful poems by well-known West Indian poets such as Evan Jones, Susan J. Wallace, Edward Brathwaite, etc. She also includes some original West Indian proverbs, such as ``You live in de cement house, and no worry de hurricane.'' Each poem or proverb is matched with one of Lessac's bright, vivid paintings depicting life throughout the islands of the Caribbean. The combination of the two makes this book a real jewel. The text is descriptive of different aspects of West Indian culture; although the language used is in an English dialect, it is understandable. In addition, a few of the proverbs written in another dialect have been translated into English. The West Indies come alive in these pages through the extraordinary color contrasts in the paintings and the precise details of the West Indian landscape. This book, which will serve as a read-aloud or read-alone, will be a great addition to any library collection serving children.-- Lucrece Louisdhon-Walter, Queens Borough Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.