Cover image for On record : rock, pop, and the written word
Title:
On record : rock, pop, and the written word
Author:
Frith, Simon.
Publication Information:
New York : Pantheon Books, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
xi, 492 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780394564753

9780679722885
Format :
Book

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ML3470 .O5 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Summary

Summary

The first collection of classic essays in the serious study of popular music is full of the famous, hard-to-find, off-beat, and influential articles that have shaped rock cultural studies.


Summary

The first collection of classic essays in the serious study of popular music is full of the famous, hard-to-find, off-beat, and influential articles that have shaped rock cultural studies.


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

This comprehensive anthology of serious writings on popular music should prove to be a breakthrough in the field. Frith and Goodwin have assembled an excellent compendium of articles that examine popular music from sociological, feminist, and deconstructionist vantages (to name a few). Because they are ``concerned with arguments about music and its meaning,'' they ignore articles on rock and pop music history as well as ``judgments of personal taste,'' such as reviews. Instead, they examine multiple aspects of music and the music industry in eight sections, each prefaced with a fine bibliographic essay. The articles themselves, spanning four decades, are uniformly fine; remarkably, few seem ``dated.'' Highly recommended with a caveat: this is not a ``typical'' piece of rock music fluff but a serious work more at home in academic libraries.-- James Stephenson, Society of the Cincinnati Lib., Washington, D.C. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Library Journal Review

This comprehensive anthology of serious writings on popular music should prove to be a breakthrough in the field. Frith and Goodwin have assembled an excellent compendium of articles that examine popular music from sociological, feminist, and deconstructionist vantages (to name a few). Because they are ``concerned with arguments about music and its meaning,'' they ignore articles on rock and pop music history as well as ``judgments of personal taste,'' such as reviews. Instead, they examine multiple aspects of music and the music industry in eight sections, each prefaced with a fine bibliographic essay. The articles themselves, spanning four decades, are uniformly fine; remarkably, few seem ``dated.'' Highly recommended with a caveat: this is not a ``typical'' piece of rock music fluff but a serious work more at home in academic libraries.-- James Stephenson, Society of the Cincinnati Lib., Washington, D.C. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.