Cover image for Dumb cane and daffodils : poisonous plants in the house and garden
Title:
Dumb cane and daffodils : poisonous plants in the house and garden
Author:
Lerner, Carol.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Morrow Junior Books, 1990.
Physical Description:
32 pages ; 26 cm
Summary:
Describes the physical characteristics, natural habitats, and harmful effects of several varieties of plants grown in North America.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780688087913

9780688087968
Format :
Book

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QK100.A1 L47 1990 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Describes the physical characteristics, natural habitats, and harmful effects of several varieties of plants grown in North America.


Summary

Describes the physical characteristics, natural habitats, and harmful effects of several varieties of plants grown in North America.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 5-9. Common house and garden plants can be quite poisonous, as Lerner makes clear in this instructive and handsomely designed companion to Moonseed and Mistletoe: A Book of Poisonous Wild Plants [BKL Mr 1 89]. While there are many poisonous domestic plants, Lerner selects those that grow over wide areas of North America and those that have a history of poisoning humans. Among the entries are bulbs of the narcissus genus (daffodils, snowdrops, and hyacinths among them); flower garden staples such as four-o'clocks, delphiniums, and poppies; and shrubs such as yew, hydrangea, and wisteria. The artist's elegant, captioned botanical drawings (most in color, a few in black and white) of the flowers, leaves, seeds, and internal parts grace the pages, while the text discusses the plants and their poison potential. Researchers will have to use the index for access to particular species; the text is like a leisurely lecture to be best enjoyed by browsers or plant fanciers, though everyone would be well advised to familiarize themselves with the dangers from these familiar species. An eye-opener. ~--Denise Wilms


School Library Journal Review

Following her beautiful and informative Moonseed and Mistletoe: A Book of Poisonous Wild Plants (Morrow, 1988), Lerner now directs readers' attention to the deadly qualities of hyacinths and dieffenbachia. She begins her book by warning that small children and many of the plants commonly found around the home are not a good combination. However, she also says that most just require some common sense and care to be sure that plant parts are not mistakenly ingested. Readers are warned to watch out for crocuses, snowdrops, delphiniums, and foxgloves among others. All this potential danger is offered with exquisite full-color drawings. While this book performs a service to inform home gardeners of possible dangers, its greatest help is in reaffirming a love for the beautiful creations of nature with the full knowledge that readers can protect themselves from danger and enjoy most of the plants discussed. --Steve Matthews, Foxcroft Sch . , Middleburg, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 5-9. Common house and garden plants can be quite poisonous, as Lerner makes clear in this instructive and handsomely designed companion to Moonseed and Mistletoe: A Book of Poisonous Wild Plants [BKL Mr 1 89]. While there are many poisonous domestic plants, Lerner selects those that grow over wide areas of North America and those that have a history of poisoning humans. Among the entries are bulbs of the narcissus genus (daffodils, snowdrops, and hyacinths among them); flower garden staples such as four-o'clocks, delphiniums, and poppies; and shrubs such as yew, hydrangea, and wisteria. The artist's elegant, captioned botanical drawings (most in color, a few in black and white) of the flowers, leaves, seeds, and internal parts grace the pages, while the text discusses the plants and their poison potential. Researchers will have to use the index for access to particular species; the text is like a leisurely lecture to be best enjoyed by browsers or plant fanciers, though everyone would be well advised to familiarize themselves with the dangers from these familiar species. An eye-opener. ~--Denise Wilms


School Library Journal Review

Following her beautiful and informative Moonseed and Mistletoe: A Book of Poisonous Wild Plants (Morrow, 1988), Lerner now directs readers' attention to the deadly qualities of hyacinths and dieffenbachia. She begins her book by warning that small children and many of the plants commonly found around the home are not a good combination. However, she also says that most just require some common sense and care to be sure that plant parts are not mistakenly ingested. Readers are warned to watch out for crocuses, snowdrops, delphiniums, and foxgloves among others. All this potential danger is offered with exquisite full-color drawings. While this book performs a service to inform home gardeners of possible dangers, its greatest help is in reaffirming a love for the beautiful creations of nature with the full knowledge that readers can protect themselves from danger and enjoy most of the plants discussed. --Steve Matthews, Foxcroft Sch . , Middleburg, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.