Cover image for Directed by Vincente Minnelli
Title:
Directed by Vincente Minnelli
Author:
Harvey, Stephen.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Museum of Modern Art : Harper & Row, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
315 pages : illustrations ; 29 cm
General Note:
"Published on the occasion of the exhibition, Directed by Vincent Minnelli, the Museum of Modern Art, New York, December 15, 1989-January 28, 1990."--T.p. verso.
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
Added Corporate Author:
ISBN:
9780870704741

9780060162634
Format :
Book

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PN1998.3.M55 H37 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
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PN1998.3.M55 H37 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
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On Order

Reviews 4

Library Journal Review

Harvey argues that Minnelli deserves a place in the pantheon of American feature directors alongside Ford, Hitchcock, Welles, et al. Film history, according to Harvey, associate curator of the Museum of Modern Art's Department of Film, has slighted Minnelli because of his long career under MGM contract (1940-66). Scholars usually cast the restraints of the studio system as the major antagonist of the serious director. Therefore the cogency of Minnelli's personal style has either been missed altogether or (wrongly) surmised to be simply more of the stylish extravagance endemic to the ``majors.'' Destined to reign as the definitive study of Minnelli's work because of its ebullient engrossment in detail and historical gestalt, this is also the first major monograph devoted to the topic. On a scale rivaling an erotic reverie in dance by Minnelli, Harvey's mellifluous tribute has great appeal. Essential for all film collections.-- Robert Rayher, Sch. of the Art Inst. of Chicago (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

"You cannot tell a book by its cover," goes the aphorism, so one might dismiss this as no more than a color-saturated coffee table prop. But Harvey (associate curator, Museum of Modern Art, New York) has extended the genre beyond its merely decorous limits. His book on Minnelli is admirably grounded in thorough research in both public and private archives ranging from the Lincoln Center Library of the Performing Arts to the less easily accessible MGM legal files. The result is a richly detailed celebration of a Hollywood contract-director and the corporate system in which he worked. Predictably, such a handsome book necessarily resulted from the cooperation of MGM, its veteran workers, and its most recent owner, Ted Turner Entertainment, Inc. Thus, this work is far from the conventional Hollywood story of "individualistic directors in a fight to the death with intransigent moguls." Instead the book focuses on a tale of a "long harmonious relationship between this painstaking filmmaker and his employers." Sadly, the reader is not allowed to follow Harvey through the paper trail into Minnelli's career; the sources of the juiciest quotations as well as the most arcane insider stories are never footnoted. Yet, the book is a good title-by-title Hollywood biography that also manages to speak in a voice with a bit of bite to it. There is a bibliography, richly detailed filmography, and color and black-and-white photographs, but no index. T. Cripps Morgan State University


Library Journal Review

Harvey argues that Minnelli deserves a place in the pantheon of American feature directors alongside Ford, Hitchcock, Welles, et al. Film history, according to Harvey, associate curator of the Museum of Modern Art's Department of Film, has slighted Minnelli because of his long career under MGM contract (1940-66). Scholars usually cast the restraints of the studio system as the major antagonist of the serious director. Therefore the cogency of Minnelli's personal style has either been missed altogether or (wrongly) surmised to be simply more of the stylish extravagance endemic to the ``majors.'' Destined to reign as the definitive study of Minnelli's work because of its ebullient engrossment in detail and historical gestalt, this is also the first major monograph devoted to the topic. On a scale rivaling an erotic reverie in dance by Minnelli, Harvey's mellifluous tribute has great appeal. Essential for all film collections.-- Robert Rayher, Sch. of the Art Inst. of Chicago (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

"You cannot tell a book by its cover," goes the aphorism, so one might dismiss this as no more than a color-saturated coffee table prop. But Harvey (associate curator, Museum of Modern Art, New York) has extended the genre beyond its merely decorous limits. His book on Minnelli is admirably grounded in thorough research in both public and private archives ranging from the Lincoln Center Library of the Performing Arts to the less easily accessible MGM legal files. The result is a richly detailed celebration of a Hollywood contract-director and the corporate system in which he worked. Predictably, such a handsome book necessarily resulted from the cooperation of MGM, its veteran workers, and its most recent owner, Ted Turner Entertainment, Inc. Thus, this work is far from the conventional Hollywood story of "individualistic directors in a fight to the death with intransigent moguls." Instead the book focuses on a tale of a "long harmonious relationship between this painstaking filmmaker and his employers." Sadly, the reader is not allowed to follow Harvey through the paper trail into Minnelli's career; the sources of the juiciest quotations as well as the most arcane insider stories are never footnoted. Yet, the book is a good title-by-title Hollywood biography that also manages to speak in a voice with a bit of bite to it. There is a bibliography, richly detailed filmography, and color and black-and-white photographs, but no index. T. Cripps Morgan State University