Cover image for Daring to be bad : radical feminism in America, 1967-1975
Title:
Daring to be bad : radical feminism in America, 1967-1975
Author:
Echols, Alice.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
416 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780816617869

9780816617876
Format :
Book

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HQ1421 .E25 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

From the late 1960s to the early 1970s, radical feminism was the most dynamic force within the women's movement. Yet, in the more than twenty years since the emergence of contemporary feminism, there has been no book-length study of this branch of the movement. Alice Echols's text fills this void. Cloth edition (unseen), $35.00. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Summary

Examines the most controversial and explosive shaping force in the women's movement in America, and traces its influence on modern feminism.


Reviews 4

Library Journal Review

The women's liberation movement that began in 1967 is an absorbing study in political struggle. Radical women rejecting male dominance also rejected conventional political and organizational techniques. Their consciousness raised, they scrutinized each step, each meeting, each action, seeking theory and political practice untainted by patriarchal or hierarchical elements. Echols traces the volatile history of this movement, explaining clearly the positions of the various groups, the reasons for splintering and division, the controversies. She shows how ideas emerged that have changed American attitudes and assumptions. If we are still debating the relative importance of gender, class, and race, combating the power of capitalism and patriarchy, this valuable study shows that the discussion owes much to the radical feminists who hewed out the outlines of these issues.-- Mary Drake McFeely, Univ . of Georgia Libs., Athens (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Recent history is a dangerous area for historians. Alice Echols argues that the issues, personalities, and organizations of the radical feminists of the late 1960s and early 1970s require careful analysis and documentation at this time or their story will be lost, distorted, or overtaken by the cultural feminists who succeeded them. Echols's study is based upon interviews of many of the leading participants, particularly in New York, as well as on the writings of the movement. It is an interesting and worthwhile effort to make sense of one strand of the feminist movement, i.e., that which identified gender as the primary cause of women's oppression. This group stood in contrast to the socialists, who called class and race the crucial factors, and to the liberals, who saw the system as needing reform but not revolution. The book is especially useful for advanced students in women's history who will feel as if they have returned to that earlier era and become observers in the quarrel. J. Sochen Northeastern Illinois University


Library Journal Review

The women's liberation movement that began in 1967 is an absorbing study in political struggle. Radical women rejecting male dominance also rejected conventional political and organizational techniques. Their consciousness raised, they scrutinized each step, each meeting, each action, seeking theory and political practice untainted by patriarchal or hierarchical elements. Echols traces the volatile history of this movement, explaining clearly the positions of the various groups, the reasons for splintering and division, the controversies. She shows how ideas emerged that have changed American attitudes and assumptions. If we are still debating the relative importance of gender, class, and race, combating the power of capitalism and patriarchy, this valuable study shows that the discussion owes much to the radical feminists who hewed out the outlines of these issues.-- Mary Drake McFeely, Univ . of Georgia Libs., Athens (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Recent history is a dangerous area for historians. Alice Echols argues that the issues, personalities, and organizations of the radical feminists of the late 1960s and early 1970s require careful analysis and documentation at this time or their story will be lost, distorted, or overtaken by the cultural feminists who succeeded them. Echols's study is based upon interviews of many of the leading participants, particularly in New York, as well as on the writings of the movement. It is an interesting and worthwhile effort to make sense of one strand of the feminist movement, i.e., that which identified gender as the primary cause of women's oppression. This group stood in contrast to the socialists, who called class and race the crucial factors, and to the liberals, who saw the system as needing reform but not revolution. The book is especially useful for advanced students in women's history who will feel as if they have returned to that earlier era and become observers in the quarrel. J. Sochen Northeastern Illinois University