Cover image for Yellowstone primer : land and resource management in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem
Title:
Yellowstone primer : land and resource management in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem
Author:
Baden, John.
Publication Information:
San Francisco, Calif. : Pacific Research Institute for Public Policy, 1990.
Physical Description:
xii, 226 pages ; 22 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780936488233

9780936488240
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
QH105.W8 Y45 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Reviews 2

Choice Review

This compilation of 11 essays by resource economists, naturalists, and environmental writers focuses on the management problems and opportunities in the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem as a model for natural resource decisionmaking. The essays illustrate how destructive ecological practices and economic inefficiencies mirror important problems of the larger society. The key message that emerges is that striking reform is necessary in order to link sound environmental management with planned economic growth. In Part 1, foundations for management reform are presented in articles on "The New Resource Economics" and the need for buffer zones. Part 2 covers problems of balancing human use and preservation in articles on water resource management, private property rights, wolf reintroduction, and oil and gas development. Part 3 looks at the politics of ecological reform in articles discussing the role of scientific information in management decision making, resource management and the media, and the concept of endowment boards. Part 4 is a postscript that looks at the human-nature relationship. Recommended to general readers and to advanced undergraduates interested in the politics of environmental policy and management. S. Hollenhorst West Virginia University


Choice Review

This compilation of 11 essays by resource economists, naturalists, and environmental writers focuses on the management problems and opportunities in the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem as a model for natural resource decisionmaking. The essays illustrate how destructive ecological practices and economic inefficiencies mirror important problems of the larger society. The key message that emerges is that striking reform is necessary in order to link sound environmental management with planned economic growth. In Part 1, foundations for management reform are presented in articles on "The New Resource Economics" and the need for buffer zones. Part 2 covers problems of balancing human use and preservation in articles on water resource management, private property rights, wolf reintroduction, and oil and gas development. Part 3 looks at the politics of ecological reform in articles discussing the role of scientific information in management decision making, resource management and the media, and the concept of endowment boards. Part 4 is a postscript that looks at the human-nature relationship. Recommended to general readers and to advanced undergraduates interested in the politics of environmental policy and management. S. Hollenhorst West Virginia University