Cover image for A consumer's dictionary of cosmetic ingredients
Title:
A consumer's dictionary of cosmetic ingredients
Author:
Winter, Ruth, 1930-
Personal Author:
Edition:
New, third revised edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Crown, 1989.
Physical Description:
330 pages ; 20 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780517572634
Format :
Book

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TP983 .W5 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Summary

Summary

The fifth edition of this classic guide, first published in 1978, continues the tradition of being the most up-to-date, complete, and trusted reference for taking the guesswork out of choosing safe and effective cosmetics and toiletries.   The more than 6,000 entries include 1,400 newly developed chemicals (along with hundreds more whose names have been changed by the manufacturers since the last edition of this book was published in 1994). Virtually every chemical found in toiletries and cosmetics, from body and face creams to toothpaste, hand lotion, shaving cream, shampoo, soap, perfume, and makeup, is evaluated, including those ingredients marketed as being all natural, for children, and for people of color. The book's alphabetical arrangement makes it easy to look up the ingredients in the products you use. With more substances than ever in products we use every day--and with the continuing deregulation of the cosmetics industry--this book is more indispensable than ever.


Excerpts

Excerpts

A ABEYANCE • The term used by the FDA that includes petitions that were filed and were found after detailed review by the Office of Food Additive (OFAS) or certain cosmetic colorings to be deficient. OFAS does not actively work on petitions in abeyances. When all the information required to address the deficiency or deficiencies is provided, a petition can be refiled and assigned a new filing date. ABIES • A. alba, A. balsamea, A. pectinata, A. sibirica. Essential oils derived from a variety of pine trees. They are used as natural flavoring ingredients and to scent bath products. Ingestion of large amounts can cause intestinal hemorrhages. ABIES ALBA LEAF WAX • A wax obtained from the needles of Abies alba (see above). It is used as a skin-conditioning ingredient and as a skin protectant. ABIES PECTINATA OIL • The volatile oil from Abies alba (see) used as a fragrance ingredient. ABIETIC ACID • Abietinol. Abietol. Sylvic acid. Chiefly a texturizer in the making of soaps. A widely available natural acid, water-insoluble, prepared from pine rosin, usually yellow and composed of either glassy or crystalline particles. Used also in the manufacture of vinyls, lacquers, and plastics. Little is known about abietic acid toxicity; it is harmless when injected into mice but causes paralysis in frogs and is slightly irritating to human skin and mucous membranes. May cause allergic reactions. ABIETYL ALCOHOL • Increases thickness. See Abietic Acid ABITOL • Dihydroabietyl Alcohol. Used in cosmetics, plastics, and adhesives. See Abietic Acid ABRADE • Scrape or erode a covering, such as skin. ABRASIVE • Natural or synthetic cosmetic ingredients intended to rub away or scrape the surface layer of cells or tissue from the skin. ABSOLUTE • The term refers to a plant-extracted material that has been concentrated but that remains essentially unchanged in its original taste and odor. For example, see Jasmine Absolute. Often called "natural perfume materials" because they are not subjected to heat and water as are distilled products. See Distilled ABSORBENT • An ingredient or cosmetic that has the capacity to absorb. ABSORPTION BASES • Compounds used to improve the water-absorbing capacity and stability of creams, lotions, and hairdressings. Lanolin-type absorption bases are mixtures of lanolin alcohols, mineral oil, and petrolatum (see all). Also used as bases are cholesterol and beeswax (see both). ACACIA • Gum Arabic. Catechu. Acacia is the odorless, colorless, tasteless dried exudate from the stem of the acacia tree, grown in Africa, the Near East, India, and the southern United States. Its most distinguishing quality among the natural gums is its ability to dissolve rapidly in water. The use of acacia dates back 4,000 years, when the Egyptians employed it in paints. Medically, it is used as a demulcent to soothe irritations, particularly of the mucous membranes. It can cause allergic reactions such as skin rash and asthmatic attacks. Oral toxicity is low, but the FDA issued a notice in 1992 that catechu tincture had not been shown to be safe and effective as claimed in OTC digestive aid products. See also Vegetable Gums and Catechu Black ACACIA DEALBATA LEAF WAX • Acacia dealbata. Mimosa, Silver Wattle. Obtained from the leaves of a prickly Egyptian shrub. It is used as a skin-conditioning ingredient, emollient, and skin protectant. Used in moisturizers, cleaning products, blushers, eye shadow, and foundations. It is considered a poisonous house plant. ACACIA FARNESIAN EXTRACT • Acacia Extract. Flowers, and stems of Acacia farnesiana. It is used as an astringent. ACACIA FARNESIANA GUM • AEC Gum Arabic. Acacia senegal Gum. Widely used all over the world, it acts as an adhesive Excerpted from A Consumer's Dictionary of Cosmetic Ingredients: NEW Third Revised Edition by Ruth Winter All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.