Cover image for Without shelter : homelessness in the 1980's
Title:
Without shelter : homelessness in the 1980's
Author:
Rossi, Peter H. (Peter Henry), 1921-2006.
Publication Information:
New York : Priority Press Publications, 1989.
Physical Description:
vi, 79 pages ; 24 cm
General Note:
"A Twentieth Century Fund paper."
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780870782350

9780870782343
Format :
Book

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HV4505 .R67 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Reviews 2

Choice Review

Rossi's brief work offers an excellent summary of the current state of knowledge concerning who the homeless are, how today's homeless differ from those of the past, why they are homeless, and how they differ from other equally poor people who have homes. What is especially deplorable about today's homeless is that this population includes so many people, e.g. children, the mentally ill, and physically disabled, who are largely powerless to alter their situations. Rossi argues that the conventional definition of "disabled" be expanded to include chronic drug abusers, including alcoholics. Rossi, an eminent sociologist who has written extensively on homelessness, concludes with several policy recommendations, both short-term and long-term, which seem sensible enough; without a major shift in national priorities, however, they will remain merely "recommendations." Rossi presents his material in a readable, nontechnical way; there are a couple of straightforward tables. Many references are included in the chapter endnotes, but there is no bibliography. There is a short, but useful, index. This book would be a good supplemental text for undergraduate courses in social problems, social policy, or urban studies; it will be of interest to professionals as well. K. Hadden University of Connecticut


Choice Review

Rossi's brief work offers an excellent summary of the current state of knowledge concerning who the homeless are, how today's homeless differ from those of the past, why they are homeless, and how they differ from other equally poor people who have homes. What is especially deplorable about today's homeless is that this population includes so many people, e.g. children, the mentally ill, and physically disabled, who are largely powerless to alter their situations. Rossi argues that the conventional definition of "disabled" be expanded to include chronic drug abusers, including alcoholics. Rossi, an eminent sociologist who has written extensively on homelessness, concludes with several policy recommendations, both short-term and long-term, which seem sensible enough; without a major shift in national priorities, however, they will remain merely "recommendations." Rossi presents his material in a readable, nontechnical way; there are a couple of straightforward tables. Many references are included in the chapter endnotes, but there is no bibliography. There is a short, but useful, index. This book would be a good supplemental text for undergraduate courses in social problems, social policy, or urban studies; it will be of interest to professionals as well. K. Hadden University of Connecticut