Cover image for The turn of the screw : bewildered vision
Title:
The turn of the screw : bewildered vision
Author:
Heller, Terry, 1947-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Twayne, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
xiii, 151 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780805780802

9780805781236
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
PS2116.T83 H38 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...

On Order

Reviews 2

Choice Review

Heller (Coe College) adds this succinct treatment to his published writings about Henry James's well-known ghost story. Essentially, Heller aims to provide students and close readers with a theoretical and up-to-date basis for the interpretive rereading of James's novella. Accepting the feminist identification of the frame narrator as a woman and making much use of Jacques Lacan's psychoanalytic perspectives, Heller stresses the meanings of the basic ambiguities in the imaging and narrative of the story. Although he may add relatively little to the older confronting essays of Edmund Wilson and Robert Heilman (cited in the text but not located in his bibliography), Heller succeeds in bringing their issues up for fresh debate. And while some may feel he is too willing to apply the term "love" to the governess's feeling for the absentee master of Bly and too unwilling to evaluate James's artistic intention and techniques, at least he provides a stimulating basis for new arguments about that achievement. The brevity of the book alone may attract undergraduate readers. A. E. Jones, Jr., emeritus Drew University


Choice Review

Heller (Coe College) adds this succinct treatment to his published writings about Henry James's well-known ghost story. Essentially, Heller aims to provide students and close readers with a theoretical and up-to-date basis for the interpretive rereading of James's novella. Accepting the feminist identification of the frame narrator as a woman and making much use of Jacques Lacan's psychoanalytic perspectives, Heller stresses the meanings of the basic ambiguities in the imaging and narrative of the story. Although he may add relatively little to the older confronting essays of Edmund Wilson and Robert Heilman (cited in the text but not located in his bibliography), Heller succeeds in bringing their issues up for fresh debate. And while some may feel he is too willing to apply the term "love" to the governess's feeling for the absentee master of Bly and too unwilling to evaluate James's artistic intention and techniques, at least he provides a stimulating basis for new arguments about that achievement. The brevity of the book alone may attract undergraduate readers. A. E. Jones, Jr., emeritus Drew University