Cover image for Mindfield : new and selected poems
Title:
Mindfield : new and selected poems
Author:
Corso, Gregory.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York, N.Y. : Thunder's Mouth Press, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
xix, 268 pages ; 21 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780938410850

9780938410867
Format :
Book

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PS3505.O763 A6 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Republished with a new cover and a new introduction by David Amram, this publication includes forewords by two legendary Beat writers, William S. Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg.


Summary

Poems deal with mortality, the sea, music, writers, artists, travel, nature, dreams, and guilt.


Author Notes

In 1957, Allen Ginsberg wrote of Corso, "He's probably the greatest poet in America, and he's starving in Europe." Corso's themes are death and beauty, always in American terms.

Virtually an orphan, Corso was born on Bleecker Street in New York's Greenwich Village. He spent his childhood and youth in and out of foster homes. During his numerous prison terms, he was introduced to literature by a fellow convict. On his release, he met Ginsberg, who immediately recognized his talent and helped him.

(Bowker Author Biography)


In 1957, Allen Ginsberg wrote of Corso, "He's probably the greatest poet in America, and he's starving in Europe." Corso's themes are death and beauty, always in American terms.

Virtually an orphan, Corso was born on Bleecker Street in New York's Greenwich Village. He spent his childhood and youth in and out of foster homes. During his numerous prison terms, he was introduced to literature by a fellow convict. On his release, he met Ginsberg, who immediately recognized his talent and helped him.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Publisher's Weekly Review

Once a Beat bad boy, Corso has grown up, revealed to good and ill effect in this collection of new and familiar work. At his best when driven by a blast of heretical energy, the insurgent is able to persuade us of the wisdom in bedlam. ``Be abnormal sex a crime? / Then be it everybody's crime,'' he suggests in the previously unpublished ``On Chessman's Crime,'' contending that no act of passion is purely or simply sordid, no matter what convention may decree. In a classic like ``Marriage,'' the poet performs a manic, hilarious balancing act in considering the right and wrong of propriety (``the girl next door'') versus creative anarchy (the mischievous garble of ``Radio belly! Cat shovel!''). Especially in some poems from his middle period, Corso's sense of play wanes, and he whines wordily, lectures and declaims. Still, few are as sincere--or as much fun--in making a virtue of perversity. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

This first major volume by Corso in eight years includes selections from six previous collections, ranging from The Vestal Lady on Brattle (1955) to Herald of the Autochthonic Spirit (1981), plus 23 previously uncollected poems spanning his entire career (including five dated 1989). Corso's three most memorable poems--``Marriage,'' ``Bomb,'' and ``Elegiac Feelings American''--are included, along with others that will remind readers of Corso's lyric grace and ability to view life with enthusiasm and humor bordering on self-mockery, no matter what the cost. Even the topicality of many poems, which would date the work of lesser poets, is given continual freshness by Corso's startling imagery. Line drawings by the author, embodying the same innocence as the poems, are a perfect complement. Essential.-- Rochelle Ratner, formerly Poetry Editor, ``Soho Weekly News,'' New York (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

The publication of Mindfield merits celebration. After 35 years of work from one of the most original American voices of his generation, this long-overdue volume includes substantial selections from each of his six volumes of published poetry and 23 previously unpublished poems. Corso has written a number of the most memorable American poems since WW II. His poetry combines a lyrical directness of speech with a unique blend of surrealism and aphoristic statement. This is a poetry that astonishes: wild lyricism, surreal images ("Penguin dust, bring me penguin dust") and a point of view that handles ideas with incredible imagination. Corso was a central figure among the Beats and continues to work the tradition of Villon and Rimbaud. The volume contains drawings by Corso and forewords by Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs, but it lacks an index of first lines. Recommended for all collections of poetry and general literature. L. Berk Florida Keys Community College


Publisher's Weekly Review

Once a Beat bad boy, Corso has grown up, revealed to good and ill effect in this collection of new and familiar work. At his best when driven by a blast of heretical energy, the insurgent is able to persuade us of the wisdom in bedlam. ``Be abnormal sex a crime? / Then be it everybody's crime,'' he suggests in the previously unpublished ``On Chessman's Crime,'' contending that no act of passion is purely or simply sordid, no matter what convention may decree. In a classic like ``Marriage,'' the poet performs a manic, hilarious balancing act in considering the right and wrong of propriety (``the girl next door'') versus creative anarchy (the mischievous garble of ``Radio belly! Cat shovel!''). Especially in some poems from his middle period, Corso's sense of play wanes, and he whines wordily, lectures and declaims. Still, few are as sincere--or as much fun--in making a virtue of perversity. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

This first major volume by Corso in eight years includes selections from six previous collections, ranging from The Vestal Lady on Brattle (1955) to Herald of the Autochthonic Spirit (1981), plus 23 previously uncollected poems spanning his entire career (including five dated 1989). Corso's three most memorable poems--``Marriage,'' ``Bomb,'' and ``Elegiac Feelings American''--are included, along with others that will remind readers of Corso's lyric grace and ability to view life with enthusiasm and humor bordering on self-mockery, no matter what the cost. Even the topicality of many poems, which would date the work of lesser poets, is given continual freshness by Corso's startling imagery. Line drawings by the author, embodying the same innocence as the poems, are a perfect complement. Essential.-- Rochelle Ratner, formerly Poetry Editor, ``Soho Weekly News,'' New York (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

The publication of Mindfield merits celebration. After 35 years of work from one of the most original American voices of his generation, this long-overdue volume includes substantial selections from each of his six volumes of published poetry and 23 previously unpublished poems. Corso has written a number of the most memorable American poems since WW II. His poetry combines a lyrical directness of speech with a unique blend of surrealism and aphoristic statement. This is a poetry that astonishes: wild lyricism, surreal images ("Penguin dust, bring me penguin dust") and a point of view that handles ideas with incredible imagination. Corso was a central figure among the Beats and continues to work the tradition of Villon and Rimbaud. The volume contains drawings by Corso and forewords by Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs, but it lacks an index of first lines. Recommended for all collections of poetry and general literature. L. Berk Florida Keys Community College