Cover image for Red revolution : inside the Philippine guerrilla movement
Title:
Red revolution : inside the Philippine guerrilla movement
Author:
Jones, Gregg R.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boulder, Colo. : Westview Press, 1989.
Physical Description:
360 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1440 Lexile.
ISBN:
9780813306445

9780813308777
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
DS686.5 .J64 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Much has been written about Aquino's government in the Philippines. This work examines her most powerful opposition. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)


Summary

Much has been written about Aquino's government in the Philippines. This work examines her most powerful opposition. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Jones covered the Philippines for American and British newspapers between 1984 and 1989, thereby gaining unusual access to the Communist guerrilla leaders and rank-and-file party members, all of whom have fomented trouble for Marcos and for Aquino. Focusing primarily on the underground guerrilla movement, Jones offers readers an unusual glimpse into this Pacific embroilment. He finds the guerrilla revolution there to be "a product of the classical Third World fusion of peasant unrest and nationalism." Among the more eye-opening discoveries Jones makes is that the infamous Plaza Miranda bombing (commonly accepted to have been inspired by Marcos) was actually planned and carried out by Communist party forces. Similarly, Jones recalls previously unpublished details of the party's secret mission to China in the 1970s. Bibliography and index appended. --Allen Weakland


Publisher's Weekly Review

Jones, Manila correspondent for the Washington Post , spent much of 1987-1988 in ``red zones'' in the Philippines talking with Communist leaders, guerrillas of the New People's Army and Filipinos living in Communist-controlled rural barrios. His access to outlaw sources was remarkable, and so is his book, a detailed, objective depiction of a clandestine revolutionary movement in the midst of its protracted struggle. Jones scores an impressive coup in presenting convincing evidence that the 1971 Plaza Miranda bombing (its victims were leading critics of Ferdinand Marcos) was not conceived by Marcos but by the Communist Party of the Philippines. The rebel leadership expected the bombing to spark an uprising that would lead to an early Communist victory. Things didn't work out that way, but the bombing, according to the author, was a brilliant tactical move in view of Marcos's fierce response and the ability of the CPP to exploit it. Jones expects the struggle to simmer on for years, and notes that the Aquino government has made ``precious little headway'' against the movement. Photos not seen by PW. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Choice Review

Controversy and instability have characterized Philippine politics for the last generation. The history of this nation's fractious elite politics has been reported on far more than the steady growth of communist rebellion throughout the islands. New books by Gregg Jones and Richard Kessler correct the imbalance by focusing on the communist movement. In his insider's journalistic account, Jones chronicles both the rise of the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP) from the ashes of the old party (PKP) and the development of the New People's Army (NPA) into a force challenging the Philippine armed forces. Jones interviewed a large cast of party leaders and followers to craft the most proficient and definitive history of the party from 1969 to 1989. He examines the ideological influence of party founder Jose Maria Sison and describes how Bernabe Buscayno, better known as Commander Dante, revived remnants of old Huk forces and formed new bases for guerrilla conflict. Initially the Philippine revolution modeled itself after Mao's people's war strategy, but in this sympathetic portayal of the rebels, Jones argues that the movement has developed local roots because its operations have been decentralized over two decades. In his scholarly and analytical study, Rebellion and Repression in the Phillippines, Kessler establishes the social context in which guerilla conflict takes place. To Kessler, rebellion is the norm in Philippine history, not the exception, and he traces a 200-year pattern of peasant struggle. Most of his commentary on the CCP and NPA is derived from secondary sources; the account is therefore less immediate than Jones's personalized narrative, but his treatment is relatively objective and insightful. Kessler balances analysis of CPP and NPA with a chapter on the armed forces in which he points out their inadequacy in dealing with the current level of insurgency. This volume is superior to Leonard Davis's Revolutionary Struggle in the Philippines (CH, Feb'90). Both Jones and Kessler leave the impression that the Philippine revolution has reached a decisive state; they estimate that many provinces are affected, with peasant support for revolution widespread, and they believe the government's endorsement of rightist vigilante groups is proving counterproductive. Neither author believes there will be ready implementation of land reform or improved social welfare policies, which reduce discontent. That this rebellion increasingly threatens the Philippine government has less to do with the intensity of revolutionary forces than with questions about legitimacy and effectiveness of the Philippine government to which the US is allied. Both books will leave readers troubled at the prospects for US policy in the Philippines. All levels. -G. A. McBeath, University of Alaska, Fairbanks


Booklist Review

Jones covered the Philippines for American and British newspapers between 1984 and 1989, thereby gaining unusual access to the Communist guerrilla leaders and rank-and-file party members, all of whom have fomented trouble for Marcos and for Aquino. Focusing primarily on the underground guerrilla movement, Jones offers readers an unusual glimpse into this Pacific embroilment. He finds the guerrilla revolution there to be "a product of the classical Third World fusion of peasant unrest and nationalism." Among the more eye-opening discoveries Jones makes is that the infamous Plaza Miranda bombing (commonly accepted to have been inspired by Marcos) was actually planned and carried out by Communist party forces. Similarly, Jones recalls previously unpublished details of the party's secret mission to China in the 1970s. Bibliography and index appended. --Allen Weakland


Publisher's Weekly Review

Jones, Manila correspondent for the Washington Post , spent much of 1987-1988 in ``red zones'' in the Philippines talking with Communist leaders, guerrillas of the New People's Army and Filipinos living in Communist-controlled rural barrios. His access to outlaw sources was remarkable, and so is his book, a detailed, objective depiction of a clandestine revolutionary movement in the midst of its protracted struggle. Jones scores an impressive coup in presenting convincing evidence that the 1971 Plaza Miranda bombing (its victims were leading critics of Ferdinand Marcos) was not conceived by Marcos but by the Communist Party of the Philippines. The rebel leadership expected the bombing to spark an uprising that would lead to an early Communist victory. Things didn't work out that way, but the bombing, according to the author, was a brilliant tactical move in view of Marcos's fierce response and the ability of the CPP to exploit it. Jones expects the struggle to simmer on for years, and notes that the Aquino government has made ``precious little headway'' against the movement. Photos not seen by PW. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Choice Review

Controversy and instability have characterized Philippine politics for the last generation. The history of this nation's fractious elite politics has been reported on far more than the steady growth of communist rebellion throughout the islands. New books by Gregg Jones and Richard Kessler correct the imbalance by focusing on the communist movement. In his insider's journalistic account, Jones chronicles both the rise of the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP) from the ashes of the old party (PKP) and the development of the New People's Army (NPA) into a force challenging the Philippine armed forces. Jones interviewed a large cast of party leaders and followers to craft the most proficient and definitive history of the party from 1969 to 1989. He examines the ideological influence of party founder Jose Maria Sison and describes how Bernabe Buscayno, better known as Commander Dante, revived remnants of old Huk forces and formed new bases for guerrilla conflict. Initially the Philippine revolution modeled itself after Mao's people's war strategy, but in this sympathetic portayal of the rebels, Jones argues that the movement has developed local roots because its operations have been decentralized over two decades. In his scholarly and analytical study, Rebellion and Repression in the Phillippines, Kessler establishes the social context in which guerilla conflict takes place. To Kessler, rebellion is the norm in Philippine history, not the exception, and he traces a 200-year pattern of peasant struggle. Most of his commentary on the CCP and NPA is derived from secondary sources; the account is therefore less immediate than Jones's personalized narrative, but his treatment is relatively objective and insightful. Kessler balances analysis of CPP and NPA with a chapter on the armed forces in which he points out their inadequacy in dealing with the current level of insurgency. This volume is superior to Leonard Davis's Revolutionary Struggle in the Philippines (CH, Feb'90). Both Jones and Kessler leave the impression that the Philippine revolution has reached a decisive state; they estimate that many provinces are affected, with peasant support for revolution widespread, and they believe the government's endorsement of rightist vigilante groups is proving counterproductive. Neither author believes there will be ready implementation of land reform or improved social welfare policies, which reduce discontent. That this rebellion increasingly threatens the Philippine government has less to do with the intensity of revolutionary forces than with questions about legitimacy and effectiveness of the Philippine government to which the US is allied. Both books will leave readers troubled at the prospects for US policy in the Philippines. All levels. -G. A. McBeath, University of Alaska, Fairbanks


Table of Contents

Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
Acronymsp. xxi
Introductionp. 1
1 A Resilient Revolutionp. 5
2 Launching the Strugglep. 17
3 A People's Army Takes Shapep. 31
4 Collapse and Retreatp. 45
5 The Ghosts of Plaza Mirandap. 59
6 Prisoners in a Gilded Cagep. 71
7 Shaping the Revolutionp. 85
8 Indigenizing People's War""""""""p. 95
9 Martial Law and the Urban Undergroundp. 103
10 The Manila Rebellionp. 113
11 The New People's Army Tastes Successp. 123
12 The Battle for Davaop. 133
13 The Elusive United Frontp. 145
14 The Election Boycott and Strategic Debates: 1985-1987p. 155
15 Talking Peace While Preparing for Warp. 165
16 Land to the Tillers""""""""p. 175
17 Barangay Rose: Life in a Communist Villagep. 185
18 Revolution in the Churchp. 201
19 Inside the Labor Frontp. 215
20 Inside the New People's Armyp. 223
21 People's War: The Third Decadep. 239
22 The Faces Behind the Revolutionp. 251
23 A Terrible Time""""""""p. 265
24 People's Republic of the Philipp0ines""""""""p. 277
25 Red Christmasp. 285
26 Facing the Futurep. 295
Notesp. 315
Glossaryp. 337
Bibliographyp. 339
Indexp. 347
Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
Acronymsp. xxi
Introductionp. 1
1 A Resilient Revolutionp. 5
2 Launching the Strugglep. 17
3 A People's Army Takes Shapep. 31
4 Collapse and Retreatp. 45
5 The Ghosts of Plaza Mirandap. 59
6 Prisoners in a Gilded Cagep. 71
7 Shaping the Revolutionp. 85
8 Indigenizing People's War""""""""p. 95
9 Martial Law and the Urban Undergroundp. 103
10 The Manila Rebellionp. 113
11 The New People's Army Tastes Successp. 123
12 The Battle for Davaop. 133
13 The Elusive United Frontp. 145
14 The Election Boycott and Strategic Debates: 1985-1987p. 155
15 Talking Peace While Preparing for Warp. 165
16 Land to the Tillers""""""""p. 175
17 Barangay Rose: Life in a Communist Villagep. 185
18 Revolution in the Churchp. 201
19 Inside the Labor Frontp. 215
20 Inside the New People's Armyp. 223
21 People's War: The Third Decadep. 239
22 The Faces Behind the Revolutionp. 251
23 A Terrible Time""""""""p. 265
24 People's Republic of the Philipp0ines""""""""p. 277
25 Red Christmasp. 285
26 Facing the Futurep. 295
Notesp. 315
Glossaryp. 337
Bibliographyp. 339
Indexp. 347