Cover image for The American backwoods frontier : an ethnic and ecological interpretation
Title:
The American backwoods frontier : an ethnic and ecological interpretation
Author:
Jordan-Bychkov, Terry G., 1938-2003.
Publication Information:
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
xiii, 340 pages : illustrations, maps ; 26 cm.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780801836862
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
F157.D4 J67 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
F157.D4 J67 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Author Notes

The W. P. Webb Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Texas in Austin, Terry G. Jordan received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin in 1965 and was part of the strong tradition in historical geography there. Over the past 20 years, he has produced a set of books that combine the best traditions in cultural geography. In these works he has included both cultural landscape features, such as building types, and more broadly relevant historical topics, such as ethnicity.

Jordan, who has served as president of the Association of American Geographers, also has brought his expertise to general texts in cultural geography.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Jordan's wonderfully lucid and incisive book may well be the single most important discussion of the elements that shaped the American frontier since Frederick Jackson Turner's The Frontier in American History (1920). Jordan and Kaups, two historical geographers, provide a tightly argued and well-documented case for a revisionist model of how and by whom the American backwoods frontier was settled. By employing concepts from cultural ecology, the authors theorize that techniques that allowed North European settlers, especially the Scotch-Irish, to successfully exploit the eastern woodland environment and to expand westward were in fact borrowed from the 17th-century Finno-Scandinavian settlers of the Delaware Valley and the Delaware Indians with whom those settlers interacted. Painstaking fieldwork in Europe and archival evidence are combined to support their thesis that the Finno-Scandinavian culture was preadapted to American frontier conditions and provided ideas and methods that were successfully used by other groups that arrived later. Extensive notes; bibliography; numerous maps. All libraries. -K. B. Raitz, University of Kentucky