Cover image for I become part of it : sacred dimensions in native American life
Title:
I become part of it : sacred dimensions in native American life
Author:
Dooling, D. M.
Publication Information:
New York, N.Y. : Parabola Books, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
291 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780930407070
Format :
Book

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E98.S7 I5 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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E98.S7 I5 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

This collection of essays and stories, many of which first appeared in Parabola magazine, range from descriptions of traditional Native American lifestyles and sacred rituals to startlingly apt prophesies of the coming of Europeans and descriptions of the struggle to live the traditional Native teachings in a world that has gone in a very different direction. Some of the topics explored include kachinas, the irreverent Hopi clowns; Navajo healing sand paintings; a dramatic firsthand description of a spirit-quest; the purpose of art in Native cultures; and the role of masks in ritual and in self-knowledge. The stories included are retellings of traditional tales; the text is further enhanced by a series of powerful illustrations by contemporary Native American artists.


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

This collection of stories and essays offers welcome relief from the flood of pseudo-Indian spirituality cluttering libraries and bookstores. Introduced by poet/editor Joseph Bruchac, a leader in the study and dissemination of authentic texts, this work includes stories (admirably genuine) from the Iroquois, Abenaki, Cherokee, Pueblo, Winnebago, Salish, Coos-Coquille, Blackfoot, Pawnee, Lakota, Navajo, and Cheyenne and essays by Joseph Epes Brown, Sam Gill, Barre Toelken, Barbara Tedlock, Emory Sekaquaptewa, and Vine Deloria, among others--names that mean something. Recommended for its impeccable scholarship and valuable insights: ``It may be that American Indians contain the last best hope for spiritual renewal in a world dominated by material considerations.''-- Rhoda Carroll, Vermont Coll., Montpelier (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.