Cover image for Clay
Title:
Clay
Author:
Hull, Jeannie.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
London ; New York : F. Watts, 1989.
Physical Description:
48 pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm.
Summary:
Gives instructions, in step-by-step photographs, for preparing clay and making thumb and coil pots and decorated tiles and how to use glaze.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Subject Term:

ISBN:
9780531107577
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Material Type
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TT916 .H85 1989 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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TT916 .H85 1989 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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TT916 .H85 1989 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Gives instructions, in step-by-step photographs, for preparing clay and making thumb and coil pots and decorated tiles and how to use glaze.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 2-7. Those who found Rowe's The Children's Book of Pottery [BKL De 1 89] popular will also want to add Hull's book to their collection. The teaching approach combines tightly cropped step-by-step photos with adjacent explanatory text--a real boon, as are the stylishly composed shots of finished examples. These titles offer exciting incentives to the child potter, who will learn techniques for pinch, slab, and coil pots; tiles with impressed or applied decoration; and the basics of firing and glazing. After the dynamics of three-dimensional work, Lancaster's Paper Sculpture is more tame but holds appeal for those who enjoyed Cardboard and Lettering, also part of the Fresh Start series. Examples of pricking, tearing, and crumpling appear in collage landscapes; how-to's for papier-mache are given; and two techniques for making paper (fairly messy and labor intensive) are demonstrated. This handsome, well-structured series continues to have multilayered applicability for a wide age range. --Phillis Wilson


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-- Two books that are clear, concise, and well formatted. The print is fairly large, and the text is easy to read. Both books provide enough information to complete the projects but not so much that imagination is stifled. Children are carried along, not plummeted into the projects. As they become more comfortable with the medium used, they are given more difficult projects with which to expand and experiment. Each book gives instructions in step-by-step photographs and text. Clay also includes a brief history, explaining the hows and whys of the processes and their origins. --Evelyn Squillari, Clark County Library District, Las Vegas (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.