Cover image for Dax's case : essays in medical ethics and human meaning
Title:
Dax's case : essays in medical ethics and human meaning
Author:
Kliever, Lonnie D.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Dallas, Tex. : Southern Methodist University Press, 1989.
Physical Description:
xvii, 221 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780870742774

9780870742781
Format :
Book

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RD96.4.C69 D38 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Donald "Dax" Corvert survived a gas explosion in 1973 and now practices law although he is blind, disfigured, and maimed. After his accident he asked to be allowed to die, and, even now, he feels he should have been allowed his wish in order to avoid the suffering he endured. Here are essays by people from various disciplines writing in response to a film about his case and compiled by Kliever (religious studies, SMU). Paperback edition (unseen), $12.95. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)


Summary

Donald practices law although he is blind, disfigured, and maimed. After his accident he asked to be allowed to die, and, even now, he feels he should have been allowed his wish in order to avoid the suffering he endured. Here are essays by people from various disciplines writing in response to a film about his case and compiled by Kliever (religious studies, SMU). Paperback edition (unseen), $12.95. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Reviews 2

Choice Review

A collection of 12 essays centered upon the now classic case of Dax Cowart's demand to be allowed to die following a devastating disfiguring calamity in 1973. A videotape, Please Let Me Die (1974) and a film, Dax's Case (1985) provide much of the background for the contributors, who range from physicians and lawyers to ethicists and theologians. They offer insightful and provocative comments on the issues presented by Dax's injury, despair, agony, and endurance. Some of the essays relate to the facts of the case (K. Burton, "A Chronicle: Dax's Case as It Happened"; R. White, "A Memoir: Dax's Case Twelve Years Later"), others deal with issues of rights, autonomy, paternalism, euthanasia, and the quality of life (J. Childress and C. Campbell, "Who Is a Doctor to Decide Whether a Person Lives or Dies?"; H.T. Engelhardt Jr., "Freedom vs Best Interest: A Conflict at the Roots of Health Care"), and others challenge us to new ways of thinking (R. Zaner, "Failed or Ongoing Dialogues? Dax's Case"; S. Johannesen, "On Why We Should Not Agree with Dax"). This book joins a rich assortment of bioethic anthologies, including comprehensive titles (T. Beauchamp and L. Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 3rd ed., 1989) and more specialized treatments (Cross Cultural Perspectives in Medical Ethics, ed. by R.M. Veatch, 1989). Helpful notes and references are included. Recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above. M. Kayhart Cedar Crest College


Choice Review

A collection of 12 essays centered upon the now classic case of Dax Cowart's demand to be allowed to die following a devastating disfiguring calamity in 1973. A videotape, Please Let Me Die (1974) and a film, Dax's Case (1985) provide much of the background for the contributors, who range from physicians and lawyers to ethicists and theologians. They offer insightful and provocative comments on the issues presented by Dax's injury, despair, agony, and endurance. Some of the essays relate to the facts of the case (K. Burton, "A Chronicle: Dax's Case as It Happened"; R. White, "A Memoir: Dax's Case Twelve Years Later"), others deal with issues of rights, autonomy, paternalism, euthanasia, and the quality of life (J. Childress and C. Campbell, "Who Is a Doctor to Decide Whether a Person Lives or Dies?"; H.T. Engelhardt Jr., "Freedom vs Best Interest: A Conflict at the Roots of Health Care"), and others challenge us to new ways of thinking (R. Zaner, "Failed or Ongoing Dialogues? Dax's Case"; S. Johannesen, "On Why We Should Not Agree with Dax"). This book joins a rich assortment of bioethic anthologies, including comprehensive titles (T. Beauchamp and L. Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 3rd ed., 1989) and more specialized treatments (Cross Cultural Perspectives in Medical Ethics, ed. by R.M. Veatch, 1989). Helpful notes and references are included. Recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above. M. Kayhart Cedar Crest College