Cover image for Low-intensity conflict : the pattern of warfare in the modern world
Title:
Low-intensity conflict : the pattern of warfare in the modern world
Author:
Thompson, Loren B.
Publication Information:
Lexington, Mass. : Lexington Books, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
xi, 207 pages ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780669200447

9780669200454
Format :
Book

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U240 .L68 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

The likelihood of full scale war is small. Much more likely are a series of low level conflicts with undetermined lengths. This timely book does an excellent job of examining the causes and responses to this kind of warfare. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)


Summary

The likelihood of full scale war is small. Much more likely are a series of low level conflicts with undetermined lengths. This timely book does an excellent job of examining the causes and responses to this kind of warfare. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Reviews 2

Choice Review

The essayists are experienced policymakers and academics who are committed to the critical need to deal with Low-Intensity Conflict (LIC) as the current and future form of violence confronting US foreign policy and world politics. Although the definitional problem of LIC haunts each essay, the emphases are on advisory (Israeli and Soviet cases) and direct responses by the US. The book bogs down into a discussion of Washington turf battles, past and present, and excessive (re)organizational schemes. There is a typical US response--weak on substantive and strong on bureaucratic changes. Ryan's essay on economic response notwithstanding, causality theory is simply not addressed. The contributors fail to develop the political sociology, the economics, and the social psychology that are central to analyzing and responding to the LIC phenomenon. Everyone refers to these variables and then simply goes on to the turf/strategic struggles. No one addresses "political risk analysis" or "stability/instability dynamics," namely causality. Personnel skills and background are dealt with only in Yaniv's essay. Aside from O'Brien's essay on legal substantive responses, the ultimate thrust is military dimensions fought out in a Washington political setting. In this respect it is a valuable book for upper-division undergraduates. -B. Schechterman, University of Miami


Choice Review

The essayists are experienced policymakers and academics who are committed to the critical need to deal with Low-Intensity Conflict (LIC) as the current and future form of violence confronting US foreign policy and world politics. Although the definitional problem of LIC haunts each essay, the emphases are on advisory (Israeli and Soviet cases) and direct responses by the US. The book bogs down into a discussion of Washington turf battles, past and present, and excessive (re)organizational schemes. There is a typical US response--weak on substantive and strong on bureaucratic changes. Ryan's essay on economic response notwithstanding, causality theory is simply not addressed. The contributors fail to develop the political sociology, the economics, and the social psychology that are central to analyzing and responding to the LIC phenomenon. Everyone refers to these variables and then simply goes on to the turf/strategic struggles. No one addresses "political risk analysis" or "stability/instability dynamics," namely causality. Personnel skills and background are dealt with only in Yaniv's essay. Aside from O'Brien's essay on legal substantive responses, the ultimate thrust is military dimensions fought out in a Washington political setting. In this respect it is a valuable book for upper-division undergraduates. -B. Schechterman, University of Miami