Cover image for The moon comes home
Title:
The moon comes home
Author:
Salter, Mary Jo.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Knopf, 1989.
Physical Description:
32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
On the trip home by car from Grandmother's house, a young child observes the moon.
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780394899831

9780394999838
Format :
Book

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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

On the trip home by car from Grandmother's house, a young child observes the moon.


Summary

On the trip home by car from Grandmother's house, a young child observes the moon.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Ages 5-7. The moon seems omnipresent to the unnamed little girl in this story. Her first-person narrative describes how she notices the moon as she and her family depart from Grandmother's house and travel by car through the night. The story's quiet, intimate feel and Salter's images loom vividly: "All the long trip home, / the moon trailed us like a dog, / but peacefully . . . like a fog / that drifts without a sound." Schuett's fluid illustrations play with perspective, showing much of the scenery from the angle of the child stretched out on the car's back seat. They capture the dreamy, contemplative mood that overtakes drowsy children as they pass the time with imagination and a unique sense of wonder. --Denise Wilms


School Library Journal Review

PreS-K-- A quiet study of the moon by a young girl who watches it, ``a circle like an eye,'' framed in the window of her family's car as they drive home from her grandmother's house. She is fascinated with the fact that the moon is always with her no matter how far and how fast she goes, reminiscent of Harold's ever-present moon in Johnson's Harold and the Purple Crayon (Harper, 1958) . The poetic text is tranquil; it may be too slow for some readers, but the mood that the text creates and the warmth of the illustrations, along with Schuett's masterful use of color and light, make this a good choice for bedtime reading. --Nancy Curtin, Port Washington Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 5-7. The moon seems omnipresent to the unnamed little girl in this story. Her first-person narrative describes how she notices the moon as she and her family depart from Grandmother's house and travel by car through the night. The story's quiet, intimate feel and Salter's images loom vividly: "All the long trip home, / the moon trailed us like a dog, / but peacefully . . . like a fog / that drifts without a sound." Schuett's fluid illustrations play with perspective, showing much of the scenery from the angle of the child stretched out on the car's back seat. They capture the dreamy, contemplative mood that overtakes drowsy children as they pass the time with imagination and a unique sense of wonder. --Denise Wilms


School Library Journal Review

PreS-K-- A quiet study of the moon by a young girl who watches it, ``a circle like an eye,'' framed in the window of her family's car as they drive home from her grandmother's house. She is fascinated with the fact that the moon is always with her no matter how far and how fast she goes, reminiscent of Harold's ever-present moon in Johnson's Harold and the Purple Crayon (Harper, 1958) . The poetic text is tranquil; it may be too slow for some readers, but the mood that the text creates and the warmth of the illustrations, along with Schuett's masterful use of color and light, make this a good choice for bedtime reading. --Nancy Curtin, Port Washington Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.