Cover image for Thank you, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr!
Title:
Thank you, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr!
Author:
Tate, Eleanora E.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : F. Watts, 1990.
Summary:
The children of Gumbo Grove Elementary School discover the contributions of many famous Afro-Americans during Black History Month.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780531151518

9780531109045
Format :
Book

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FICTION Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Holiday
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FICTION Juvenile Fiction Holiday
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Summary

Summary

The children of Gumbo Grove Elementary School discover the contributions of many famous Afro-Americans during Black History Month. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.


Summary

The children of Gumbo Grove Elementary School discover the contributions of many famous Afro-Americans during Black History Month.


Reviews 2

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-- Fourth grader Mary Elouise Avery struggles with a low self-image in this consciousness-raising story of black pride. When Gumbo Grove Elementary School prepares for its annual Presidents' Month play, Mary Elouise is selected as narrator for the new black history segment. She dislikes the role, as she feels that it emphasizes the difference between her and her Barbiesque classroom idol, Brandy. Her mother scolds her for disposing of black dolls in favor of white dolls, and her perceptive grandmother advises her to ``love yourself for who you are.'' By story's end, her part in the play has given Mary Elouise a better understanding of her heritage. She also has a new idol, a black storyteller who perceives her angst and challenges her to seek any goal with determination. The message is clear, and the plot is predictable. Except for the condescending naivete of a white teacher, characters offer a positive perspective on black culture. This purposeful novel conveys the challenge of maintaining ethnic pride in a society dominated by whites. Mary Elouise learns about her heritage, herself, and friendship in this first-person narrative. Realistic dialogue and peer conflicts, plus Mary Elouise's insights make this an appropriate choice for young readers. --Gerry Larson, Chewning Junior High School, Durham, NC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-- Fourth grader Mary Elouise Avery struggles with a low self-image in this consciousness-raising story of black pride. When Gumbo Grove Elementary School prepares for its annual Presidents' Month play, Mary Elouise is selected as narrator for the new black history segment. She dislikes the role, as she feels that it emphasizes the difference between her and her Barbiesque classroom idol, Brandy. Her mother scolds her for disposing of black dolls in favor of white dolls, and her perceptive grandmother advises her to ``love yourself for who you are.'' By story's end, her part in the play has given Mary Elouise a better understanding of her heritage. She also has a new idol, a black storyteller who perceives her angst and challenges her to seek any goal with determination. The message is clear, and the plot is predictable. Except for the condescending naivete of a white teacher, characters offer a positive perspective on black culture. This purposeful novel conveys the challenge of maintaining ethnic pride in a society dominated by whites. Mary Elouise learns about her heritage, herself, and friendship in this first-person narrative. Realistic dialogue and peer conflicts, plus Mary Elouise's insights make this an appropriate choice for young readers. --Gerry Larson, Chewning Junior High School, Durham, NC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.