Cover image for The King's day : Louis XIV of France
Title:
The King's day : Louis XIV of France
Author:
Aliki.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Crowell, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.6 0.5 30713.
ISBN:
9780690045888

9780690045901
Format :
Book

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DC129 .A59 1989 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Summary

Summary

A day in the life of France's King Louis XIV, focusing on the elaborate ceremonies which took place when he dressed in the morning, ate his meals, conducted affairs of state, entertained, and finally, when he prepared to go to bed at night.


Summary

A day in the life of France's King Louis XIV, focusing on the elaborate ceremonies which took place when he dressed in the morning, ate his meals, conducted affairs of state, entertained, and finally, when he prepared to go to bed at night.


Author Notes

Aliki was born Aliki was born on September 3, 1929 in Wildwood Crest, New Jersey and raised in Philadelphia, PA. She graduated from the Philadelphia Museum College of Art in 1951. After college, she worked in the display department at J. C. Penney Co. in New York for a year and then as a free-lance artist and art teacher in Philadelphia. In 1956 she spent several months traveling, painting, and sketching in Europe.

In 1957, Aliki married Franz Brandenberg, also a writer, and they settled in Switzerland, where she worked as a free-lance artist. In 1960 the Brandenbergs moved to New York City. Aliki continued to write and illustrate children's books, both fiction and nonfiction. As well as illustrating her own works, she has also illustrated over fifty books for others, including those of her husband Franz, Joanna Cole and Paul Showers.

Aliki and her family moved to England in 1977 where she continues to write and illustrate. She has been the recipient of many honours including the New York Academy of Sciences Children's Book Award and the Prix du Livre pour Enfants (Geneva). She received the New Jersey Institute of Technology Award for The Listening Walk in 1961 and for Bees and Beelines in 1964, the Boys Club of America Junior Book Award for Three Gold Pieces: A Greek Folk Tale in 1968, and the Children's Book Showcase for At Mary Bloom's in 1977. She also won the New York Academy of Sciences (younger) Award for Corn Is Maize: The Gift of the Indians in 1977 and the Garden State Children's Book Award (younger nonfiction) for Mummies Made In Egypt in 1982.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Aliki was born Aliki was born on September 3, 1929 in Wildwood Crest, New Jersey and raised in Philadelphia, PA. She graduated from the Philadelphia Museum College of Art in 1951. After college, she worked in the display department at J. C. Penney Co. in New York for a year and then as a free-lance artist and art teacher in Philadelphia. In 1956 she spent several months traveling, painting, and sketching in Europe.

In 1957, Aliki married Franz Brandenberg, also a writer, and they settled in Switzerland, where she worked as a free-lance artist. In 1960 the Brandenbergs moved to New York City. Aliki continued to write and illustrate children's books, both fiction and nonfiction. As well as illustrating her own works, she has also illustrated over fifty books for others, including those of her husband Franz, Joanna Cole and Paul Showers.

Aliki and her family moved to England in 1977 where she continues to write and illustrate. She has been the recipient of many honours including the New York Academy of Sciences Children's Book Award and the Prix du Livre pour Enfants (Geneva). She received the New Jersey Institute of Technology Award for The Listening Walk in 1961 and for Bees and Beelines in 1964, the Boys Club of America Junior Book Award for Three Gold Pieces: A Greek Folk Tale in 1968, and the Children's Book Showcase for At Mary Bloom's in 1977. She also won the New York Academy of Sciences (younger) Award for Corn Is Maize: The Gift of the Indians in 1977 and the Garden State Children's Book Award (younger nonfiction) for Mummies Made In Egypt in 1982.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Gr. 2-5. Once again Aliki works her magic--as she did in A Medieval Feast [BKL O 1 83]-- presenting an in-depth portrait of a fascinating slice of history. This time her subject is Louis XIV of France, about whom little is written for children. Aliki's trademark, writing a simple story in a picture-book format accompanied by elaborate color drawings, allows her books to be read at two different levels. Between each illustration and the straightforward text is a caption that reveals the more-sophisticated details that older readers relish. Children will gain insight into the self-centered complexity of the absolute monarch through the presentation of the elaborate daily rituals of rising, attending mass, eating, holding court, and going to bed. The thousands of servants, the immense meals, and the grandeur of Louis' costumes and palaces, such as Versailles, are aptly depicted in delicate lines and luxurious colors. Both the text and the captions are sprinkled with French words, defined on the last page beneath the chronology of the Sun King's life. --Deborah Abbot


Publisher's Weekly Review

This engrossing and carefully researched account of court life, customs and activities is illustrated with meticulously detailed watercolors in vibrant hues. Ages 7-11. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-5-- As she did in A Medieval Feast (Crowell, 1983), Aliki draws upon prints and pictures from art history and incorporates facts about real people and places to introduce young people to a high period of Western history. In this case the ``moment'' she recreates is a day at the royal court of Versailles. Pictures of Louis XIV and his court are framed by a narrow gold border; many of the illustrations have inscriptions underneath in the manner of 17th-century engravings. The text, in bolder print, adds facts and explanations to the descriptive pictures. Color is the most striking element in Aliki's drawings. The richness of the king's costumes, his wigs, lace, red stockings, and high- heeled shoes are echoed by the attire of his courtiers. The pictures vary in size and placement, leading readers' eyes through the events of the king's day, from the royal rising ritual to the final ceremonial ``coucher'' or going-to-bed. The spectacular size of the palace of Versailles and the crowded events of court life, all centering on the elaborately costumed figure of Louis XIV, capture the spirit of absolute monarchy in a form that will surely appeal to curious children in this age of democracy and the common man. The book contains a brief chronology and a list of French words, but with no guide to pronunciation. Never mind--it is the pictures that tell the story. --Shirley Wilton, Ocean County College, Toms River, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 2-5. Once again Aliki works her magic--as she did in A Medieval Feast [BKL O 1 83]-- presenting an in-depth portrait of a fascinating slice of history. This time her subject is Louis XIV of France, about whom little is written for children. Aliki's trademark, writing a simple story in a picture-book format accompanied by elaborate color drawings, allows her books to be read at two different levels. Between each illustration and the straightforward text is a caption that reveals the more-sophisticated details that older readers relish. Children will gain insight into the self-centered complexity of the absolute monarch through the presentation of the elaborate daily rituals of rising, attending mass, eating, holding court, and going to bed. The thousands of servants, the immense meals, and the grandeur of Louis' costumes and palaces, such as Versailles, are aptly depicted in delicate lines and luxurious colors. Both the text and the captions are sprinkled with French words, defined on the last page beneath the chronology of the Sun King's life. --Deborah Abbot


Publisher's Weekly Review

This engrossing and carefully researched account of court life, customs and activities is illustrated with meticulously detailed watercolors in vibrant hues. Ages 7-11. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-5-- As she did in A Medieval Feast (Crowell, 1983), Aliki draws upon prints and pictures from art history and incorporates facts about real people and places to introduce young people to a high period of Western history. In this case the ``moment'' she recreates is a day at the royal court of Versailles. Pictures of Louis XIV and his court are framed by a narrow gold border; many of the illustrations have inscriptions underneath in the manner of 17th-century engravings. The text, in bolder print, adds facts and explanations to the descriptive pictures. Color is the most striking element in Aliki's drawings. The richness of the king's costumes, his wigs, lace, red stockings, and high- heeled shoes are echoed by the attire of his courtiers. The pictures vary in size and placement, leading readers' eyes through the events of the king's day, from the royal rising ritual to the final ceremonial ``coucher'' or going-to-bed. The spectacular size of the palace of Versailles and the crowded events of court life, all centering on the elaborately costumed figure of Louis XIV, capture the spirit of absolute monarchy in a form that will surely appeal to curious children in this age of democracy and the common man. The book contains a brief chronology and a list of French words, but with no guide to pronunciation. Never mind--it is the pictures that tell the story. --Shirley Wilton, Ocean County College, Toms River, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.