Cover image for The making of an American pluralism : Buffalo, New York, 1825- 60
Title:
The making of an American pluralism : Buffalo, New York, 1825- 60
Author:
Gerber, David A.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
xvii, 531 pages, 6 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780252015953
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
F129.B89 A24 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...
Searching...
F129.B89 A24 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
F129.B89 A24 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Grosvenor Room-Buffalo Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
F129.B89 A24 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Grosvenor Room-Buffalo Collection Non-Circ
Searching...
Searching...
F129.B89 A24 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
F129.B89 A24 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
F129.B89 A24 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

An analysis of the development of a pluralistic urban society. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Gerber provides a richly textured study that will interest immigration, urban, and labor historians. Concentrating on Buffalo in the years 1825-60, the author considers such topics as city growth, ethnic group formation, and both intraethnic and interethnic relations in his analysis of the native-born American, immigrant German, and immigrant Irish communities. Particularly well done is Gerber's examination of working-class development and identification among the three groups and the involvement and impact of the Germans and Irish in politics. He also notes that these immigrant groups were perceived and accepted differently by native-born Americans. Gerber deals effectively with the implications of that different treatment, as well as with the groups' political involvement, in his analysis of social pluralism and civic integration. An interesting additional point is the role of nativism in the development of American ethnicity. In all, a valuable study for understanding ethnicity, class, nativism, and pluralism in the antebellum city. Highly recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above. -R. Bayor, Georgia Institute of Technology