Cover image for Shooting stars
Title:
Shooting stars
Author:
Branley, Franklyn M. (Franklyn Mansfield), 1915-2002.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Crowell, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
32 pages : color illustrations ; 19 x 24 cm.
Summary:
Explains what shooting stars are, what they are made of, and what happens to them when they land on Earth.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.7 0.5 8440.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780690047011

9780690047035
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
QB741.5 .B73 1989 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Explains what shooting stars are, what they are made of, and what happens to them when they land on Earth.


Summary

Explains what shooting stars are, what they are made of, and what happens to them when they land on Earth.


Reviews 2

School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-2-- Keller's clean-lined color illustrations (supplemented by a pair of photos) provide pleasant, sometimes fanciful accompaniment to this simple essay on the origin and nature of meteors. Branley's suggestions that young readers ``lie down and gaze at the sky for an hour or so'' may not be generally taken, but, as usual, his discussion is full of clearly stated, easily grasped facts and ideas: the fact that ``a shooting star is not a star,'' the chances of being hit (not unlikely, since some airborne dust is extraterrestrial) or hurt (astronomical), some famous close encounters, and the like. This fresh look at a popular subject will be equally at home in the astronomy section and on the picture-book shelves. --John Peters, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-2-- Keller's clean-lined color illustrations (supplemented by a pair of photos) provide pleasant, sometimes fanciful accompaniment to this simple essay on the origin and nature of meteors. Branley's suggestions that young readers ``lie down and gaze at the sky for an hour or so'' may not be generally taken, but, as usual, his discussion is full of clearly stated, easily grasped facts and ideas: the fact that ``a shooting star is not a star,'' the chances of being hit (not unlikely, since some airborne dust is extraterrestrial) or hurt (astronomical), some famous close encounters, and the like. This fresh look at a popular subject will be equally at home in the astronomy section and on the picture-book shelves. --John Peters, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.