Cover image for What happened to the dinosaurs?
Title:
What happened to the dinosaurs?
Author:
Branley, Franklyn M. (Franklyn Mansfield), 1915-2002.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Crowell, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
30 pages : color illustrations ; 18 x 23 cm.
Summary:
Describes various scientific theories which explore the extinction of the dinosaurs.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 660 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.3 0.5 13832.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.9 2 Quiz: 13268 Guided reading level: L.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780690047479

9780690047493
Format :
Book

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QE862.D5 B66 1989 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Describes various scientific theories which explore the extinction of the dinosaurs.


Summary

What happened to the dinosaurs?

For millions of years these fantastic creatures roamed our planet. Then, suddenly, they all disappeared. Scientists wonder why. What could have caused this huge extinction 65 million years ago?

In this enlarged edition, distinguished writer Franklyn M. Branley and award-winning artist Marc Simont provide the perfect introduction to an always fascinating subject - the disappearance of the dinosaurs.

Outstanding Science Trade Books for Children 1989 (NSTA/CBC)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Gr. 1-3. Once again, Branley writes with authority and deceptive ease in these additions to the respected Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series for beginning readers. Marked by a sense of immediacy, Shooting Stars provides a simple, yet accurate explanation of these complex, luminous objects. At times, the text is almost lyrical, while brightly colored, cartoon-style graphics (plus a few photos) catch the eye. In What Happened to the Dinosaurs? a brief definition of what a theory is precedes a lucid discussion that focuses on the meteorite hypothesis of dinosaur extinction. Simont's handsome watercolor washes instill the reptiles with character (big, mean, and dumb) and also convey a sense of mystery. The inclusion of women scientists is admirable. These well-conceived offerings will also work well as read-alouds. --Julie Corsaro


Publisher's Weekly Review

The newest Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Book demonstrates the strengths of this dependable series: an understandable question and clear exposition of the answers that never fail to help readers to think like scientists throughout. Series originator Branley carefully lays out a number of scientific theories that answer the question posed in the title, giving the most space to theories developed after the discovery of large amounts of soot and iridium in rock layers. Simont's well-placed drawings and watercolors carefully amplify and expand the text. Ages 10-up. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-- Branley tackles the mystery of what did in the dinosaurs in this addition to his popular science series. True to his intention, he provides a clear, easy-to-understand explanation of several possible causes for the dinosaurs' extinction. He includes disease, temperature change of the Earth, and even the idea that small animals devoured the dinosaurs' eggs as possible causes of death. About half the book is spent discussing the theory which claims that comet showers and the ensuing fires, ash, and dust killed the dinosaurs and their food sources. Simont's soft watercolor illustrations clearly depict, yet effectively tone down the ferocity of the subject matter for young readers. Although Branley states several times that no theory has yet been proven, the attention he gives to the comet/Nemesis theory implies it is a more valid, better-researched theory, as compared to the others which receive only a page or two of attention. He is also reluctant to question the theory; for example, how is it that mammals and some reptiles (such as turtles and alligators) survived the comet catastrophe, while dinosaurs and plants did not? Perhaps this is making a Tyrannosaurus out of a molehill, but implied messages can sometimes be as influential as obvious ones. --Cathryn A. Camper, Minneapolis Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 1-3. Once again, Branley writes with authority and deceptive ease in these additions to the respected Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series for beginning readers. Marked by a sense of immediacy, Shooting Stars provides a simple, yet accurate explanation of these complex, luminous objects. At times, the text is almost lyrical, while brightly colored, cartoon-style graphics (plus a few photos) catch the eye. In What Happened to the Dinosaurs? a brief definition of what a theory is precedes a lucid discussion that focuses on the meteorite hypothesis of dinosaur extinction. Simont's handsome watercolor washes instill the reptiles with character (big, mean, and dumb) and also convey a sense of mystery. The inclusion of women scientists is admirable. These well-conceived offerings will also work well as read-alouds. --Julie Corsaro


Publisher's Weekly Review

The newest Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Book demonstrates the strengths of this dependable series: an understandable question and clear exposition of the answers that never fail to help readers to think like scientists throughout. Series originator Branley carefully lays out a number of scientific theories that answer the question posed in the title, giving the most space to theories developed after the discovery of large amounts of soot and iridium in rock layers. Simont's well-placed drawings and watercolors carefully amplify and expand the text. Ages 10-up. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-- Branley tackles the mystery of what did in the dinosaurs in this addition to his popular science series. True to his intention, he provides a clear, easy-to-understand explanation of several possible causes for the dinosaurs' extinction. He includes disease, temperature change of the Earth, and even the idea that small animals devoured the dinosaurs' eggs as possible causes of death. About half the book is spent discussing the theory which claims that comet showers and the ensuing fires, ash, and dust killed the dinosaurs and their food sources. Simont's soft watercolor illustrations clearly depict, yet effectively tone down the ferocity of the subject matter for young readers. Although Branley states several times that no theory has yet been proven, the attention he gives to the comet/Nemesis theory implies it is a more valid, better-researched theory, as compared to the others which receive only a page or two of attention. He is also reluctant to question the theory; for example, how is it that mammals and some reptiles (such as turtles and alligators) survived the comet catastrophe, while dinosaurs and plants did not? Perhaps this is making a Tyrannosaurus out of a molehill, but implied messages can sometimes be as influential as obvious ones. --Cathryn A. Camper, Minneapolis Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.