Cover image for Fire and ice : the greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, and nuclear winter
Title:
Fire and ice : the greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, and nuclear winter
Author:
Fisher, David E., 1932-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Harper & Row, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
232 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780060162146
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
TD883.1 .F57 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
TD883.1 .F57 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

The newest addition to a crowded field on the catastrophes listed in the subtitle above. The author, a specialist in cosmochemistry, is personally acquainted with some of the leading atmospheric researchers, giving his book a special insider's viewpoint. He shows how science really works, with all of the hesitations, contradictions, and outright errors included, but also demonstrates how, in the long run, science produces a better and better understanding of the natural world. More specifically, Fisher shows that the three potential atmospheric disasters are very real threats that should not be shrugged off as ``just theories.'' Recommended for public and academic libraries.-- Jack W. Weigel, Univ . of Michigan Lib., Ann Arbor (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Will Armageddon come via freezing or burning to death? Succinctly put, this is the question explored in Fisher's well-written and authoritative work. Consistent with the Alvarez hypothesis that meteor-induced dust clouds blotted out sunlight, resulting in both cold temperatures and the absence of photosynthesis, and leading thereby to the extinction of dinosaurs and some 75 of all the then-extant species, simultaneous or sequential detonation of nuclear warheads could result in the same phenomenon. By contrast, the increasing levels of carbon dioxide, methane, and other gases contribute to the well-publicized greenhouse effect, the result of which is a warming of the earth and the many consequential effects on current temperature-adapted agriculture, melting of polar ice, and so on. The nature and potential of each of these possibilities, as well as threats to stratospheric ozone, are conveyed in nontechnical, easily comprehended writing by a highly competent and respected cosmochemist, whose experience as a novelist accounts for the facility of translation of the technical to the readable. The reference/bibliography section is appropriate, given the voluminous literature on the major topics; adequate index. All readers. -E. J. Kormondy, University of Hawaii at Hilo