Cover image for Nicolas, where have you been?
Title:
Nicolas, where have you been?
Author:
Lionni, Leo, 1910-1999.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : A.A. Knopf : Distributed by Random House, [1987]

©1987
Physical Description:
32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Mishap turns to adventure as a young mouse learns that all birds aren't the enemies he thought they were.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.9 0.5 116273.
ISBN:
9780394883700

9780394983707

9780375944505
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

When the young mouse Nicolas sets out across the great meadow alone in search of ripe red berries, he is grabbed up by the claws of a huge bird and carried high into the sky. But that is only the beginning of Nicolas's adventure. How he gets the berries he was hoping to find, and learns to trust the very creatures he thought were his enemies, makes this Leo Lionni fable one that young children will want to hear again and again. Originally published in 1987, and unavailable in any edition for a decade, this book's theme of not judging an entire species by the bad behavior of one has a special resonance with today's reader.


Summary

Originally against the birds who get the mice's berries first, Nicolas has a change of heart after he spends some time getting to know a bird family.


Summary

When the young mouse Nicolas sets out across the great meadow alone in search of ripe red berries, he is grabbed up by the claws of a huge bird and carried high into the sky. But that is only the beginning of Nicolas's adventure. How he gets the berries he was hoping to find, and learns to trust the very creatures he thought were his enemies, makes this Leo Lionni fable one that young children will want to hear again and again. Originally published in 1987, and unavailable in any edition for a decade, this book's theme of not judging an entire species by the bad behavior of one has a special resonance with today's reader. From the Hardcover edition.


Author Notes

Leo Lionni was born in Amsterdam on May 5, 1910. He attended the University of Zurich and also earned a doctorate in Economics from the University of Genoa in 1935. He taught himself to draw by visiting museums.

After marrying Nora Maffi in 1931, Lionni moved to Milan, Italy, where he became known as a painter. In 1939 he moved to Philadelphia and began working in advertising design. Lionni held several positions in the artistic field including artistic director and design director. He also served as president of the American Institute of Graphic Arts.

Around 1960 Lionni moved back to Italy. His first of over forty children's books was Little Blue and Little Yellow. Other titles include Inch by Inch, Frederick, Swimmy, and Alexander and the Wind-up Mouse, all of which won a Caldecott Honor. In addition, he received the American Institute of Graphic Arts Gold Medal in 1984.

Lionni died on October 11, 1999 at his home in Tuscany, Italy at the age of 89.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Leo Lionni was born in Amsterdam on May 5, 1910. He attended the University of Zurich and also earned a doctorate in Economics from the University of Genoa in 1935. He taught himself to draw by visiting museums.

After marrying Nora Maffi in 1931, Lionni moved to Milan, Italy, where he became known as a painter. In 1939 he moved to Philadelphia and began working in advertising design. Lionni held several positions in the artistic field including artistic director and design director. He also served as president of the American Institute of Graphic Arts.

Around 1960 Lionni moved back to Italy. His first of over forty children's books was Little Blue and Little Yellow. Other titles include Inch by Inch, Frederick, Swimmy, and Alexander and the Wind-up Mouse, all of which won a Caldecott Honor. In addition, he received the American Institute of Graphic Arts Gold Medal in 1984.

Lionni died on October 11, 1999 at his home in Tuscany, Italy at the age of 89.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Leo Lionni was born in Amsterdam on May 5, 1910. He attended the University of Zurich and also earned a doctorate in Economics from the University of Genoa in 1935. He taught himself to draw by visiting museums.

After marrying Nora Maffi in 1931, Lionni moved to Milan, Italy, where he became known as a painter. In 1939 he moved to Philadelphia and began working in advertising design. Lionni held several positions in the artistic field including artistic director and design director. He also served as president of the American Institute of Graphic Arts.

Around 1960 Lionni moved back to Italy. His first of over forty children's books was Little Blue and Little Yellow. Other titles include Inch by Inch, Frederick, Swimmy, and Alexander and the Wind-up Mouse, all of which won a Caldecott Honor. In addition, he received the American Institute of Graphic Arts Gold Medal in 1984.

Lionni died on October 11, 1999 at his home in Tuscany, Italy at the age of 89.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Ages 4-6. Nicolas Mouse and his friends are upset because they never get the juiciest berries the birds always manage to locate them first. So Nicolas decides to find an untouched berry patch, but before he gets there he is carried off by a large bird. The frightened mouse frees himself from the bird's talons and lands in a nest full of baby birds, where he is warmly treated by their mother, who brings him some of those juicy berries he has longed for. When the birds leave the nest, Nicolas crawls down the tree and soon meets up with his mouse friends. Before he finishes describing his adventure, his chums go into a fury over Nicolas' abduction by the predator. ``War on all birds,'' they shout, and Nicolas can hardly contain them. Finally he gets a word in and tells of the birds' generosity; just then, his feathered friends show up with berries for all the mice. As wise old Uncle Raymond tells them, ``one bird doesn't make a flock''; even very young children will understand the message Lionni has tucked inside this tale. Illustrated with the artist's readily identifiable collage work, particularly handsome here, the book has marbleized designs that are incorporated into the rocks and stones of the forest, as well as textured leaves and realistic wooded branches set against expanses of white, making the trees look sky-high. The mice are chubby gray rodents complete with stuck-on brown ears and tails, charming in their simplicity. A rich story both in appearance and theme. Even preschoolers can have a book discussion about this one. IC. Birds Fiction / Mice Fiction [CIP] 86-18574


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3 The mice community is angered by the birds who continually pick the sweetest berries, while the mice are left with the unripened ones. When Nicholas goes in search of a berry patch unscathed by birds, he is snatched up by a large black bird, falls into a nest sheltering three baby birds, becomes friendly with them, and finally returns to his fellow mice, telling them of the good deeds of the bird family. The large white pages are filled with Lionni's marbleized, textured, and color paper collages. The green foliage provides a satisfying brightness to the grays, browns, and blacks. His mice and birds are well developed and multi-dimensional with their sharp-lined shapes and body parts. Facial expressions of anger and confusion are particularly effective. The text is composed of brief sentences that aptly support each page of action. The story is a little heavy-handed in its message (i.e., the final scene in which one mouse says, ``One bad bird doesn't make a flock'')a saccharine ending to an otherwise delightful story. The book has potential for prompting classroom discussions. Mary Beth Burgoyne, Mesa Public Library, Ariz. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 4-6. Nicolas Mouse and his friends are upset because they never get the juiciest berries the birds always manage to locate them first. So Nicolas decides to find an untouched berry patch, but before he gets there he is carried off by a large bird. The frightened mouse frees himself from the bird's talons and lands in a nest full of baby birds, where he is warmly treated by their mother, who brings him some of those juicy berries he has longed for. When the birds leave the nest, Nicolas crawls down the tree and soon meets up with his mouse friends. Before he finishes describing his adventure, his chums go into a fury over Nicolas' abduction by the predator. ``War on all birds,'' they shout, and Nicolas can hardly contain them. Finally he gets a word in and tells of the birds' generosity; just then, his feathered friends show up with berries for all the mice. As wise old Uncle Raymond tells them, ``one bird doesn't make a flock''; even very young children will understand the message Lionni has tucked inside this tale. Illustrated with the artist's readily identifiable collage work, particularly handsome here, the book has marbleized designs that are incorporated into the rocks and stones of the forest, as well as textured leaves and realistic wooded branches set against expanses of white, making the trees look sky-high. The mice are chubby gray rodents complete with stuck-on brown ears and tails, charming in their simplicity. A rich story both in appearance and theme. Even preschoolers can have a book discussion about this one. IC. Birds Fiction / Mice Fiction [CIP] 86-18574


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3 The mice community is angered by the birds who continually pick the sweetest berries, while the mice are left with the unripened ones. When Nicholas goes in search of a berry patch unscathed by birds, he is snatched up by a large black bird, falls into a nest sheltering three baby birds, becomes friendly with them, and finally returns to his fellow mice, telling them of the good deeds of the bird family. The large white pages are filled with Lionni's marbleized, textured, and color paper collages. The green foliage provides a satisfying brightness to the grays, browns, and blacks. His mice and birds are well developed and multi-dimensional with their sharp-lined shapes and body parts. Facial expressions of anger and confusion are particularly effective. The text is composed of brief sentences that aptly support each page of action. The story is a little heavy-handed in its message (i.e., the final scene in which one mouse says, ``One bad bird doesn't make a flock'')a saccharine ending to an otherwise delightful story. The book has potential for prompting classroom discussions. Mary Beth Burgoyne, Mesa Public Library, Ariz. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 4-6. Nicolas Mouse and his friends are upset because they never get the juiciest berries the birds always manage to locate them first. So Nicolas decides to find an untouched berry patch, but before he gets there he is carried off by a large bird. The frightened mouse frees himself from the bird's talons and lands in a nest full of baby birds, where he is warmly treated by their mother, who brings him some of those juicy berries he has longed for. When the birds leave the nest, Nicolas crawls down the tree and soon meets up with his mouse friends. Before he finishes describing his adventure, his chums go into a fury over Nicolas' abduction by the predator. ``War on all birds,'' they shout, and Nicolas can hardly contain them. Finally he gets a word in and tells of the birds' generosity; just then, his feathered friends show up with berries for all the mice. As wise old Uncle Raymond tells them, ``one bird doesn't make a flock''; even very young children will understand the message Lionni has tucked inside this tale. Illustrated with the artist's readily identifiable collage work, particularly handsome here, the book has marbleized designs that are incorporated into the rocks and stones of the forest, as well as textured leaves and realistic wooded branches set against expanses of white, making the trees look sky-high. The mice are chubby gray rodents complete with stuck-on brown ears and tails, charming in their simplicity. A rich story both in appearance and theme. Even preschoolers can have a book discussion about this one. IC. Birds Fiction / Mice Fiction [CIP] 86-18574


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3 The mice community is angered by the birds who continually pick the sweetest berries, while the mice are left with the unripened ones. When Nicholas goes in search of a berry patch unscathed by birds, he is snatched up by a large black bird, falls into a nest sheltering three baby birds, becomes friendly with them, and finally returns to his fellow mice, telling them of the good deeds of the bird family. The large white pages are filled with Lionni's marbleized, textured, and color paper collages. The green foliage provides a satisfying brightness to the grays, browns, and blacks. His mice and birds are well developed and multi-dimensional with their sharp-lined shapes and body parts. Facial expressions of anger and confusion are particularly effective. The text is composed of brief sentences that aptly support each page of action. The story is a little heavy-handed in its message (i.e., the final scene in which one mouse says, ``One bad bird doesn't make a flock'')a saccharine ending to an otherwise delightful story. The book has potential for prompting classroom discussions. Mary Beth Burgoyne, Mesa Public Library, Ariz. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.