Cover image for The Civil rights movement in America : essays
Title:
The Civil rights movement in America : essays
Author:
Lewis, David L.
Publication Information:
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, [1986]

©1986
Physical Description:
xii, 188 pages ; 23 cm.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780878052974

9780878052981
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
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Material Type
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E185.615 .C585 1986 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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E185.615 .C585 1986 Adult Non-Fiction Black History Non-Circ
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Summary

Summary

The Civil Rights Movement warrants continuing and extensive examination. The six papers in this collection, each supplemented by a follow-up assessment, contribute to a clearer perception of what caused and motivated the movement, of how it functioned, of the changes that occurred within it, and of its accomplishments and shortcomings. Its profound effect upon modern America has so greatly changed relations between the races that C. Vann Woodward has called it the "second revolution."

In a limited space the eleven scholars range with a definitive view over a large subject. Their papers analyze and emphasize the Civil Rights Movement's important aspects: its origins and causes, its strategies and tactics for accomplishing black freedom, the creative tensions in its leadership, the politics of the movement in the key state of Mississippi, and the role of federal law and federal courts.

In this collection a scholarly balance is achieved for each paper by a follow-up commentary from a significant authority. By deepening the understanding of the Civil Rights Movement, these essays underscore what has been gained through struggle, as well as acknowledging the goals that are yet to be attained.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Although no one theme dominates these essays, several writers stress the significance of local movements and the need to distinguish them from national organizations and leaders. Clayborne Carson urges historians to continue the recent emphasis on such an approach to discover the right variety of ideologies and strategies. This approach is exemplified by his own In Struggle: SNCC and the Black Awakening of the 1960s (CH, Jul '81), William Chafe's Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom (CH, Sep '80), Robert J. Norrell's Reaping the Whirlwind: The Civil Rights Movement in Tuskegee (CH, Jan '86), and Aldon D. Morris's study, The Origins of the Civil Rights Movement: Black Communities Organizing for Change (CH, Feb '85). Chafe's essay in this collection notes the increasing interest of the Civil Rights Movement in economics, and its relationship to the women's movement. John Dittmer offers an excellent essay on the Movement in Mississippi, a prelude to a forthcoming book. By contrast, David L. Lewis's essay maintains that the migration of blacks to the north and northern friends were critical to the success of the Movement. Charles Hamilton suggests that the federal courts and the legal approach were vital elements to the Civil Rights Movement. Public and academic libraries, community college level up.-L.H. Grothaus, Concordia Teachers College


Choice Review

Although no one theme dominates these essays, several writers stress the significance of local movements and the need to distinguish them from national organizations and leaders. Clayborne Carson urges historians to continue the recent emphasis on such an approach to discover the right variety of ideologies and strategies. This approach is exemplified by his own In Struggle: SNCC and the Black Awakening of the 1960s (CH, Jul '81), William Chafe's Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom (CH, Sep '80), Robert J. Norrell's Reaping the Whirlwind: The Civil Rights Movement in Tuskegee (CH, Jan '86), and Aldon D. Morris's study, The Origins of the Civil Rights Movement: Black Communities Organizing for Change (CH, Feb '85). Chafe's essay in this collection notes the increasing interest of the Civil Rights Movement in economics, and its relationship to the women's movement. John Dittmer offers an excellent essay on the Movement in Mississippi, a prelude to a forthcoming book. By contrast, David L. Lewis's essay maintains that the migration of blacks to the north and northern friends were critical to the success of the Movement. Charles Hamilton suggests that the federal courts and the legal approach were vital elements to the Civil Rights Movement. Public and academic libraries, community college level up.-L.H. Grothaus, Concordia Teachers College