Cover image for American newspaper journalists, 1926-1950
Title:
American newspaper journalists, 1926-1950
Author:
Ashley, Perry J.
Publication Information:
Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., [1984]

©1984
Physical Description:
xiii, 410 pages : illustrations, portraits ; 29 cm.
General Note:
"A Bruccoli Clark book."
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780810317079
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
PN4871 .A52 1984 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize Non-Circ
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

In the span of a quarter century, America witnessed the dawn of mass communications-commercial radio programming blossomed, mass-circulation magazines more than doubled their circulations, and television debuted. Though the combination of competition from new media and economic hard times led to a decline in the number of daily newspapers published in the United States, their circulation grew from 30 to 50 million during the period 1920-1950. Many newspapers were acquired by chains. Coverage of World War II was probably journalism's greatest achievement during these years, while the era's most significant changes included the expanded coverage of government, the beginnings of interpretive reporting and the invention of the syndicated political column. War correspondents, syndicated columnists, political 'pundits' and news analysts are among the prominent journalists found in this DLB Volume's 54 biographical entries. 54 entries include: Willis J. Abbot, Franklin P. Adams, Dorothy Day, rank E. Gannett, Arthur Krock, Max Lerner, Walter Lippmann, Anne O'Hare McCormick, H.L. Mencken, Joseph Pulitzer, Jr.Ernie Pyle, Red Smith, Dorothy Thompson and Walter Winchell.