Cover image for Mascot
Title:
Mascot
Author:
John, Antony, 1972- author.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, [2018]

©2018
Physical Description:
330 pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
"Noah Savino has been stuck in a wheelchair for months. He hates the way people treat him like he's helpless now. He's sick of going to physical therapy, where he isn't making any progress. He's tired of not having control over his own body. And he misses playing baseball--but not as much as he misses his dad, who died in the car accident that paralyzed Noah. Noah is scared he'll never feel like his old self again. He doesn't want people to think of him as different for the rest of his life. With the help of family and friends, he'll have to throw off the mask he's been hiding behind and face the fears that have kept him on the sidelines if he ever wants to move forward."--
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780062835628
Format :
Book

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J FICTION Juvenile Fiction New Materials
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On Order

Summary

Summary

This witty, heartfelt story about perseverance in the face of adversity is perfect for fans of R. J. Palacio, Cammie McGovern, and John David Anderson.

Noah Savino has been stuck in a wheelchair for months. He hates the way people treat him like he's helpless now. He's sick of going to physical therapy, where he isn't making any progress. He's tired of not having control over his own body. And he misses playing baseball--but not as much as he misses his dad, who died in the car accident that paralyzed Noah.

Noah is scared he'll never feel like his old self again. He doesn't want people to think of him as different for the rest of his life. With the help of family and friends, he'll have to throw off the mask he's been hiding behind and face the fears that have kept him on the sidelines if he ever wants to move forward.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

After a car accident killed his father and left him paralyzed, Noah Savino has been struggling. Physical therapy isn't helping. He can no longer play baseball. Plus, his mom is getting friendly with the single father next door. Things brighten when Alyssa, an old friend, rekindles their friendship, and a new student, Dee-Dub, arrives. Together, the three try to take down the class bully, who thinks girls can't play baseball, all while trying to expose Noah's mom's beau as a liar when he claims to be the mascot of the local pro team. Although Noah and his friends at times seem much wiser than 12, it is nevertheless heartening to see young characters who don't hesitate at their differences or care what other people think, especially Dee-Dub, an unusually tall and stocky middle-schooler, who proudly owns his nickname, short for ""Double Wide."" As snarky Noah gradually comes to terms with his life-changing accident in this refreshingly fast-paced novel, readers will have an easy time cheering him on as he moves toward recovery.--Lindsey Tomsu Copyright 2018 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

One year ago, a car crash killed Noah's dad and left Noah, who was starting catcher for his Little League team, paraplegic. Noah goes through the motions of physical therapy and building a new life with just his mom, locking his feelings of anger and sadness behind his sarcasm. After new kid Dee-Dub (short for "Double Wide," a nickname inflicted due to his stature) arrives in Noah's seventh grade class, the two start hanging out. Then bully Logan mocks Noah in gym, and Alyssa, the one friend Noah permitted to visit him regularly after the accident, challenges Logan to a pitch-off, roping in Dee-Dub to be hitter and Noah to catch. Meanwhile, Noah's mom has started spending time with single neighbor Mr. Dillon, something Noah plans to stop. Through the chain reaction ignited by these events, Noah learns that while part of his life is over, another chapter-one that may be better than he'd imagined-has just begun. John (Five Flavors of Dumb) blends humor and heartache in this powerful, satisfying coming-of-age story that handles Noah's experience of paraplegia with honesty and sensitivity. Ages 8-12. (Sept.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-8-After a car crash kills his father and leaves Noah in a wheelchair, he is adjusting to the changes in his life and the way that those around him treat him differently. With the help of his longtime friend Alyssa and new friend Dee-Dub, Noah embarks on a series of hilarious challenges to beat the bully, drive away his mom's new love interest, and right other wrongs. This action-packed, humorous story contains well-developed, dynamic characters who are thoughtful and relatable. As Noah navigates his new reality, he encounters and eventually learns to manage both physical and emotional challenges. There are, however, some missteps in the depiction of daily life as a wheelchair user. For example, there are several scenes in which Noah's mom lifts his motorized wheelchair, a feat which would be nearly impossible, as motorized chairs are much too heavy for a single person to lift. Or, later, when he visits a multi-story house, no information is given in the text about how he navigates to the house or if and how he travels to the upper floors. The vocabulary and themes suggest this book is suited for upper elementary and middle school readers. It contains many relevant coming-of-age themes, such as dealing with bullies, loss, disability, first love, and forgiveness. VERDICT A solid purchase for medium and large collections.-Jenifer Pickens, Holmes Middle School, Alexandria, VA © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.