Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
Y FICTION Young Adult Graphic Novel New Materials
Searching...
Searching...
Y FICTION Young Adult Graphic Novel Central Library
Searching...
Searching...
Y FICTION Young Adult Graphic Novel Graphic Novels
Searching...
Searching...
Y FICTION Young Adult Graphic Novel Graphic Novels
Searching...
Searching...
Y FICTION Young Adult Graphic Novel Graphic Novels
Searching...
Searching...
Y FICTION Young Adult Graphic Novel Graphic Novels
Searching...
Searching...
Y FICTION Young Adult Graphic Novel New Materials
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Charlie Lamonte is thirteen years old, queer, black, and questioning what was once a firm belief in God. So naturally, she's spending a week of her summer vacation stuck at an all-white Christian youth backpacking camp. As the journey wears on and the rhetoric wears thin, she can't help but poke holes in the pious obliviousness of this storied sanctuary with little regard for people like herself . . . or her fellow camper, Sydney.


Author Notes

Melanie Gillman holds an MFA in comics from the Center for Cartoon Studies, and currently lives in Denver, CO. This is their second all-colored-pencil graphic novel. Their first, Smbitten , is a lesbian romance about swing-dancing and vampirism.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* When 13-year-old Charlie, a black, queer girl, embarks on a feminist Christian backpacking trip, she hopes it will deepen her relationship with God. The beautiful mountains they hike through certainly spotlight the majesty of creation, but Charlie's the only black girl, and the hike leader's whitewashed understanding of spirituality and feminism makes it hard to feel connected to a tradition so bound up with the history of white supremacy. Still, though, there are moments of grace: her new friendship and solidarity with Sydney, a trans girl keeping her identity a secret to avoid scorn; the attractive daughter of the group's leader, who takes Charlie under her wing; and moments of quiet contemplation in a beautiful place. Gillman's lush, warm artwork, rendered entirely in colored pencil, brings the gorgeous scenery lovingly to life. The soft, luminous scenes of the mountains and nature emphasize the enormity of Charlie's undertaking, both spiritually and physically, and her interactions with the other people on the trip, from snickering over outdated concepts with Sydney to bringing up uncomfortable topics with adults, are nicely paced and expressive. With arresting artwork, this coming-of-age story, originally published as a webcomic, sensitively explores religion, spirituality, feminism, and friendship and perfectly balance thought-provoking moments with heartening humor. Perfect for anyone who loved Gene Luen Yang's American Born Chinese (2007).--Hunter, Sarah Copyright 2017 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Gillman's brutally honest and wrenchingly beautiful story of friendship explores the simultaneous pain and joy of being young and queer. On Charlie's first day at a Christian sleepaway camp for girls, she sees what she believes to be a sign from God, but she has a crisis of faith after she discovers she's the only black girl in attendance and the camp staff start treating her badly. Their cruelty only grows worse during her group's hike to a centuries-old ceremonial retreat in the mountains. On the way, Charlie meets Sydney, a transgender girl who's just as fed up with their privileged counselor and oblivious peers, and the two band together for support during the emotionally and physically grueling ordeal. The book is unflinching in its examination of how solidarity among white, cisgender women can harm others. Charlie's pain is palpable, as are Sydney's alienation and fear, producing a story that's as resonant for marginalized readers as it is enlightening for those it critiques. Throughout, Gillman's meticulously realized colored pencil landscapes remain impeccable. This book radiates love and melancholy in equal measure. (Nov.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

Faced with a week of backpacking at a Christian feminist camp for girls, 13-year-old Charlie isn't enthused. Charlie-born Charlotte-doesn't feel like a regular girl nor is even sure she's a believer. She certainly isn't white like the other campers. Not alone in her gender variance, she and her well-meaning but blinkered fellow campers come to learn that behind assumptions about both past and present are far more complex realities. Gillman's superb work with colored pencils gives a richness and dimensionality to Charlie's coming of age. (SLJ 11/17) © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6 Up-Charlie, 13, is excited to embark on an all-girls Christian camp's backpacking trip. However, despite Camp Three Peaks' commitment to feminism, head counselor Bee and many of the campers are unwittingly racist and homophobic, and Charlie, who is black and queer, grapples with self-doubt. She confides in God, wondering if a feather that follows her on her trek is a sign from above, and her spirits lift as she bonds with the more outspoken Sydney, a trans girl who feels similarly alienated. This contemplative graphic novel, taken from Gillman's ongoing webcomic, perceptively explores race, gender, faith, and friendship. Elegantly composed, richly hued images vividly portray the lush forest setting and shy, thoughtful Charlie's inner turmoil as she yearns to voice her opinions. Scenes in which she appears on the periphery of panels or crowded by the speech bubbles of her insensitive fellow campers adroitly capture her isolation. Gillman zeroes in on seemingly small yet achingly relatable moments as Charlie and Sydney's friendship slowly develops. The book subtly folds in lessons about identity and the danger of assumptions; both girls learn and grow about each other, themselves, and the larger world. VERDICT Heartfelt, stimulating, and sure to spark discussion about feminism's often less than inclusive attitudes toward marginalized groups. For all graphic novel collections.-Mahnaz Dar, School Library Journal © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.