Cover image for That Forsyte woman
Title:
That Forsyte woman
Author:
Bennett, Compton, 1900-1974, director.
Publication Information:
Burbank CA : Warner Bros. Entertainment ; [2010]

©2010
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (113 min.) sound, color; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
Beautiful, breathtaking Irene Forsyte: Men adore her. Women envy her. Love defines her. Based on the first book of John Galsworthy's The Forsyte Saga, about a woman who cannot cut her free spirit to fit the cloth of Victorian society.
General Note:
Originally produced as a motion picture in 1949.

Based on the first book of John Galsworthy's The Forsyte saga.

"This disc is expected to play back in DVD video "play only" devices, and may not play back in other DVD devices, including recorders and PC drives."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
Not rated by MPAA.
UPC:
883316289648
Format :
DVD

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Summary

Summary

Though one might have expected friction between MGM's resident "nice lady" Greer Garson and Warner Bros. notorious "bad boy" Errol Flynn, the two got along splendidly during the filming of That Forsyte Woman. Based loosely on The Man of Property, book one of John Galsworthy's Forsyte Saga, the film casts Garson as Irene Forsyte, the independently-minded wife of tradition-bound Victorian "man of property" Soames Forsyte (Flynn). Rebelling against her husband's repressed nature and preoccupation with material possessions, Irene falls in love with unconventional architect Philip Bossiney (Robert Young). When he proves to be too free-spirited even for her, Irene moves on to the Forsyte clan's black sheep, Young Jolyon (Walter Pidgeon). Soames makes a belated attempt to win his wife back, but once again proves incapable of warmth, compassion or understanding. The casting-against-type of Garson and Flynn was fascinating, even when the film itself dragged (Flynn in fact was slated to play either Bossiney or Young Jolyon, but insisted upon taking the less characteristic role of Soames). That Forstye Woman was lavishly photographed in color on MGM's standing "British" sets. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi