Cover image for Love, Africa : a memoir of romance, love, and survival
Title:
Love, Africa : a memoir of romance, love, and survival
Author:
Gettleman, Jeffrey, 1971-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, [2017]
Physical Description:
325 pages ; 24 cm
Summary:
"A seasoned war correspondent, Jeffrey Gettleman has covered every major conflict over the past twenty years, from Afghanistan to Iraq to the Congo. For the past decade, he has served as the East Africa bureau chief for the New York Times, fulfilling a teenage dream. At nineteen, Gettleman fell in love, twice. On a do-it-yourself community service trip in college, he went to East Africa--a terrifying, exciting, dreamlike part of the world in the throes of change that imprinted itself on his imagination and on his heart. But around that same time he also fell in love with a fellow Cornell student--the brightest, classiest, most principled woman he'd ever met. To say they were opposites was an understatement. She became a criminal lawyer in America; he hungered to return to Africa. For the next decade he would be torn between these two abiding passions" -- from publisher's web site.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780062284099
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

From Jeffrey Gettleman, a Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times journalist, comes a passionate, revealing story about finding love and finding a calling, set against one of the most turbulent regions in the world.



A seasoned war correspondent, Jeffrey Gettleman has covered every major conflict over the past twenty years, from Afghanistan to Iraq to the Congo. For the past decade, he has served as the East Africa bureau chief for the New York Times, fulfilling a teenage dream.



At nineteen, Gettleman fell in love, twice. On a do-it-yourself community service trip in college, he went to East Africa--a terrifying, exciting, dreamlike part of the world in the throes of change that imprinted itself on his imagination and on his heart.



But around that same time he also fell in love with a fellow Cornell student--the brightest, classiest, most principled woman he'd ever met. To say they were opposites was an understatement. She became a criminal lawyer in America; he hungered to return to Africa. For the next decade he would be torn between these two abiding passions.



A sensually rendered coming-of-age story in the tradition of Barbarian Days, Love, Africa is a tale of passion, violence, far-flung adventure, tortuous long-distance relationships, screwing up, forgiveness, parenthood, and happiness that explores the power of finding yourself in the most unexpected of places.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* Gettleman recounts his two decades in journalism in this exciting, harrowing memoir that aptly displays why he's a Pulitzer Prize winner and a New York Times bureau chief. In college at Cornell in the 1990s, Gettleman discovered his two true loves: East Africa and a beautiful, bright fellow student named Courtenay. These two passions end up being at war with each other: the more Gettleman seeks out a career that takes him to the region he feels at home in (first in a brief stint as an aid worker, and then as a correspondent), it puts both geographical and emotional distance between him and Courtenay, who is pursuing her own dream of being a public defender. But even as Gettleman's job takes him to war-torn countries like Afghanistan and Iraq (and into other women's beds), he can't quite let go of the hope of a future with Courtenay. Whether he's recounting a terrifying encounter with a child killer or running afoul of the Ethiopian government, there's a thrilling immediacy and attention to detail in Gettleman's writing that puts the reader right beside him. Combining that with his gimlet-eyed observations on East Africa and his love for the region, especially Kenya, Gettleman's memoir is an absolute must-read.--Huntley, Kristine Copyright 2017 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

A journalist juggles a relationship and overseas adventure in this hectic memoir. Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times correspondent Gettleman recounts his dangerous reporting from global hot spots: interviewing Taliban POWs in Afghanistan; surveying firefights and suicide-bomb carnage in Iraq; and exploring famines, insurgencies, tribal massacres, and a pirate café in East Africa, where he is the Times bureau chief. Sharing many of his exploits is his wife and sometime colleague Courtenay; their star-crossed relationship, including bouts of infidelity, complicates his wanderlust. Gettleman's narrative has the virtues and limitations of journalism; it's colorful, evocative and immediate, but also distracted and somewhat shapeless. Many episodes are riveting: Gettleman was abducted by Iraqi insurgents (he escaped by pretending to be Greek instead of American), and he and Courtenay accompanied Ogaden rebels on a gruelling desert trek only to be thrown in prison by Ethiopian soldiers. Unfortunately, the storm-tossed-romance theme feels inflated; it bogs down in bickering between Gettleman and Courtenay, and sometimes entices the author into purplish prose (one illicit tryst in Baghdad "[left] a wet spot on the sheets as blood settled into pools out on the streets"). Africa definitely feels like the more compelling of Gettleman's passions, rendered here in engrossing reportage. (May) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

Gettleman, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and East Africa bureau chief for the New York Times, chronicles his career, along with the hardships that accompany his unique and often perilous profession. The author falls in love with Africa during a college trip and is determined to return, but this infatuation causes discord with his girlfriend Courtenay. The book plods at the beginning but gains momentum when Gettleman takes a job at a Florida newspaper. Inspired by journalist Rick Bragg, he resolves to root out intriguing stories. This persistence lands him overseas post-9/11, reporting from the Middle East and Africa. Gettleman demonstrates the toll that itinerant journalism takes on a relationship and how it contributes to a perpetual state of disquietude. He also reveals the hubris and naivete that can be associated with the quest for the next groundbreaking story. Complex political issues pertaining to Africa lack sufficient context and depth, and the love story component is not compelling enough to make up for this. VERDICT Despite its flaws, this book is a vivid and valuable contribution to the literature of war correspondents. Readers should also seek out the work of Philip Gourevitch, Janine di Giovanni, and Megan K. Stack for more rigorous -narratives.-Barrie Olmstead, -Sacramento P.L. © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.