Cover image for The March against fear : the last great walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the emergence of Black power
Title:
The March against fear : the last great walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the emergence of Black power
Author:
Bausum, Ann, author.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Washington, D.C. : National Geographic, [2017]

©2017
Physical Description:
143 pages : black & white illustrations, map ; 24 cm
Summary:
"Mississippi. 1966. On a hot June afternoon an African-American man named James Meredith set out to walk through his home state, intending to fight racism and fear with his feet. A seemingly simple plan, but one teeming with risk. Just one day later Meredith was shot and wounded in a roadside ambush. Within twenty-four hours, Martin Luther King, Jr., Stokely Carmichael, and other civil rights leaders had taken up Meredith's cause, determined to overcome this violent act and complete Meredith's walk. The stakes were high--there was no time for advance planning and their route cut through dangerous territory. No one knew if they would succeed. By many measures the March Against Fear became one of the greatest protests of the civil rights era. But it was also one of the last, and the campaign has been largely forgotten. Critically acclaimed author Ann Bausum brings this crucial turning point of civil rights history back to life, escorting you along the dusty Mississippi roads where heroic marchers endured violence, rage, and fear as they walked more than 200 miles in the name of equality and justice."--Provided by publisher.
Language:
English
Contents:
A tremor -- Wild ideas -- Reactions -- Revived -- Delta bound -- Black power -- Earthquake -- White rage -- Supremacy -- Reunited -- Finale -- Aftershocks.
Reading Level:
Ages 12 and up.
ISBN:
9781426326653

9781426326660
Format :
Book

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E185.93.M6 B37 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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E185.93.M6 B37 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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E185.93.M6 B37 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area-Black History
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E185.93.M6 B37 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

James Meredith's 1966 march in Mississippi began as one man's peaceful protest for voter registration and became one of the South's most important demonstrations of the civil rights movement. It brought together leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. and Stokely Carmichael, who formed an unlikely alliance that resulted in the Black Power movement, which ushered in a new era in the fight for equality. The retelling of Meredith's story opens on the day of his assassination attempt and goes back in time to recount the moments leading up to that event and its aftermath. Readers learn about the powerful figures and emerging leaders who joined the over 200-mile walk that became known as the "March Against Fear." Thoughtfully presented by award-winning author Ann Bausum, this book helps readers understand the complex issues of fear, injustice, and the challenges of change. It is a history lesson that's as important and relevant today as it was 50 years ago.


Author Notes

The National Geographic Kid is curious about the world around them, empowered in the face of challenges and responsible for others and the natural world. Combining these principles with the international educational heritage of Collins, this partnership is a natural fit for books that are funny, weird, exploratory, educational and loved by children.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ask typical high-school students about the American civil rights movement, and many will mention Martin Luther King Jr. and his I Have a Dream speech. What they may not be so familiar with are the other influential individuals and momentous events that shaped the cause. This account of 1966's 200-mile freedom march from Memphis to Jackson, Mississippi, written in accessible language and peppered with quotes and period photos that bring the action alive, tells how this momentous effort, initiated by James Meredith, united the five factions of the civil rights movement: the Southern Christian Leadership Conference; the Congress of Racial Equality; the National Urban League; the NAACP; and Stokely Carmichael of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Chronological coverage conveys the fear and danger participants faced and documents Carmichael's first use of the term black power. The brief chapters build on one another, creating a complete picture for readers with limited background knowledge. This compelling account will be equally engaging for classroom resource material or individual research.--McBroom, Kathleen Copyright 2016 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

In a powerful and timely book, Bausum (Stonewall) focuses her attention on the last great march of the civil rights era, the March Against Fear, from Memphis, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss., in June 1966. Initiated by James Meredith in an effort to make Mississippi a less fearful place for black Americans, the march swelled to 15,000 people and resulted in 4,000 black Mississippian voter registrations; it also splintered the major civil rights organizations of the day and gave rise to Stokely Carmichael's Black Power movement. Bausum dissects these internal divisions with great sensitivity, lauding Martin Luther King Jr.'s peacemaking powers while illuminating the conditions that provoked others to more confrontational protest. Abundant details disclose the extent of segregation and racism, the pivotal role of law enforcement authorities, and how fraught protecting the marchers could be: state troopers used tear gas and physical assault to "suppress an act of racial defiance" when marchers tried to pitch their tents on public land. This exemplary look into civil rights history concludes with perspective and encouragement regarding ongoing struggles for social change. Archival photos and source notes are included. Ages 12-up. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-An edifying and timely exposition of James Meredith and the March Against Fear and their impact on U.S. history, past and present. Bausum's clear language and smart use of archival photos and pull quotes document how Meredith's single-man walk transformed into a larger endeavor to register and unify black voters and to alleviate the fear felt by African Americans living in a racist society (a notion that would later translate to the concept of Black Power). Readers become a part of the march as Bausum begins each chapter with the date, the distance traveled by the marchers, and their next destination. Evocative quotes from those supporting the march and those in opposition provide additional context on the sentiment felt by each side. The inclusion of racial epithets, curses, and horrific abuse emphasizes the reality of the time (an author's note explains the decision not to alter the language of quotations). Bausum expertly encapsulates the overall theme of the march during a specific episode at the Philadelphia, MS, courthouse: "Dignity over anarchy. Justice over injustice. Love in answer to hate." In the back matter, Bausum discusses her research, which included interviewing Meredith, and how civil rights remain a pertinent issue. VERDICT A must-have volume on James Meredith, the March Against Fear, and the evolution of Black Power for high school students.-Hilary Writt, Sullivan University, Lexington, KY © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.