Cover image for Strange fruit : Billie Holiday and the power of a protest song
Title:
Strange fruit : Billie Holiday and the power of a protest song
Author:
Golio, Gary, author.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Minneapolis : Millbrook Press, [2017]
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 29 cm
Summary:
"Silence. That was the response at Cafe Society the first time Billie Holiday performed a song called "Strange Fruit." In the 1930s, Billie was known as a performer of jazz and blues music, but his song wasn't either of those things, . It was a song about injustice, and it would change her life forever. Discover how two outsiders- Billie Holiday, a young black woman raised in poverty, and Abel Meeropol, the son of Jewish immigrants- combined their talents to create a song that challenged racism and paved the way for the civil rights movement."-- inside book cover
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781467751230
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
ML3930.H64 G65 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Black History
Searching...
Searching...
ML3930.H64 G65 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
ML3930.H64 G65 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area-Black History
Searching...
Searching...
ML3930.H64 G65 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
ML3930.H64 G65 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
ML3930.H64 G65 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
ML3930.H64 G65 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
Searching...
Searching...
ML3930.H64 G65 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
ML3930.H64 G65 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
ML3930.H64 G65 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
ML3930.H64 G65 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
ML3930.H64 G65 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
ML3930.H64 G65 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
ML3930.H64 G65 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
ML3930.H64 G65 2017 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

The audience was completely silent the first time Billie Holiday performed a song called "Strange Fruit." In the 1930s, Billie was known as a performer of jazz and blues music, but this song wasn't either of those things. It was a song about injustice, and it would change her life forever.

Discover how two outsiders--Billie Holiday, a young black woman raised in poverty, and Abel Meeropol, the son of Jewish immigrants--combined their talents to create a song that challenged racism and paved the way for the Civil Rights movement.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

At first glance, the picture-book format seems an odd choice for this minibiography, directed at middle-schoolers, of jazz legend Holiday and her signature song about the horrors of lynching. The vivid imagery of the lyrics and the reality underlying them are strong stuff for young sensibilities. The lengthy, text-heavy narrative follows the challenges Billie Holiday faced as a light-skinned black musician (she was often hidden from white patrons but was too white for an all-black band) before segueing into her first introduction to Abel Meeropol's Strange Fruit and the effects the song had on audiences. Riley-Webb's full-bleed acrylic illustrations are remarkably effective. Often abstract, they portray the jazz world and racial tensions of the era just before the civil rights movement. Adults will immediately catch many of the oblique references, though uninformed ­middle-graders will remain clueless. The format and back matter make this most useful in a classroom setting where it should prompt a discussion about one of the darkest times in U.S. history.--Wagner, Leon Copyright 2016 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Golio's powerful narrative turns on two moments plucked from Billie Holiday's career. The first: quitting Artie Shaw's band after enduring the latest in a long line of discriminatory incidents. The second key moment is Holiday's first performance of "Strange Fruit," which initially elicits discomfort from the audience ("A few people nearly got up from their seats and left"), followed by thunderous applause. Riley-Webb (Seed Magic) uses sweeping, flame-like brushes of color to heighten the story's emotional intensity; the lyrics of the song appear in the closing pages, along with in-depth details about Holiday's career and the cultural context of "Strange Fruit," including the history of lynching in the United States. It's a potent reminder of the power of art to combat intolerance and hate. Ages 8-12. Author's agent: Edward Necarsulmer IV, Dunow, Carlson & Lerner. (Feb.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-Singer Billie Holiday had a knack for jazz improvisation and dramatic performance, but she emerged from a difficult childhood into a world that didn't support black success. In 1938, she found a singing home in an integrated Greenwich Village club called Cafe Society. When its owner asked Holiday to sing Abel Meeropol's haunting song "Strange Fruit," she made it her own, eventually performing it throughout the country. While a song about lynching may seem a challenging choice for a picture book subject, the combination of words and images here is strikingly effective. Riley-Webb's emotionally expressive illustrations are as forceful as the topic. Done with acrylic paint and tissue collage, they are full of rough textures, curved lines, and grasping hands. In a smoothly written text, with important ideas emphasized in a larger font, Golio briefly summarizes Holiday's early life and career. He leaves out most of the seamier details and concludes his narrative with accounts of two early performances of this haunting song, the first in a private apartment in Harlem and the second in the club. Back matter includes the lyrics and two pages of exposition that define lynching and describe the subsequent history of the song and the singer. VERDICT This is not an easy book, but it is powerful-just like its theme. Consider for guided in-depth discussions on Billie Holiday and U.S. history.-Kathleen Isaacs, Children's Literature Specialist, Pasadena, MD © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.