Cover image for Strangers in their own land : anger and mourning on the American right
Title:
Strangers in their own land : anger and mourning on the American right
Author:
Hochschild, Arlie Russell, 1940- , author.
Publication Information:
New York : The New Press, 2016.

©2016
Physical Description:
xii, 351 pages : illustration ; 25 cm
Summary:
"In Strangers in Their Own Land, the renowned sociologist Arlie Hochschild embarks on a thought-provoking journey from her liberal hometown of Berkeley, California, deep into Louisiana bayou country--a stronghold of the conservative right. As she gets to know people who strongly oppose many of the ideas she famously champions, Hochschild nevertheless finds common ground and quickly warms to the people she meets--among them a Tea Party activist whose town has been swallowed by a sinkhole caused by a drilling accident--people whose concerns are actually ones that all Americans share: the desire for community, the embrace of family, and hopes for their children. Strangers in Their Own Land goes beyond the commonplace liberal idea that these are people who have been duped into voting against their own interests. Instead, Hochschild finds lives ripped apart by stagnant wages, a loss of home, an elusive American dream--and political choices and views that make sense in the context of their lives. Hochschild draws on her expert knowledge of the sociology of emotion to help us understand what it feels like to live in "red" America. Along the way she finds answers to one of the crucial questions of contemporary American politics: why do the people who would seem to benefit most from "liberal" government intervention abhor the very idea?"--
Language:
English
Contents:
Part one: The great paradox -- Traveling to the heart -- "One thing good" -- The rememberers -- The candidates -- The "least resistant personality" -- Part two: The social terrain -- Industry: "the buckle in America's energy belt" -- The state: governing the market 4,000 feet below -- The pulpit and the press: "the topic doesn't come up -- Part three: The deep story and the people in it -- The deep story -- The team player: loyalty above all -- The worshipper: invisible renunciation -- The cowboy: stoicism -- The rebel: a team loyalist with a new cause -- Part four: Going national -- The fires of history: the 1860s and the 1960s -- Strangers no longer: the power of promise -- "They say there are beautiful trees."
ISBN:
9781620972250
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

In Strangers in Their Own Land, the renowned sociologist Arlie Hochschild embarks on a thought-provoking journey from her liberal hometown of Berkeley, California, deep into Louisiana bayou country - a stronghold of the conservative right. As she gets to know people who strongly oppose many of the ideas she famously champions, Hochschild nevertheless finds common ground and quickly warms to the people she meets, people whose concerns are actually ones that all Americans share: the desire for community, the embrace of family, and hopes for their children.


Author Notes

Arlie Russell Hochschild, a professor of sociology at the University of California, Berkeley, is the author of two New York Times Notable Books of the Year, THE SECOND SHIFT and THE MANAGED HEART. She has received numerous awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship and a research grant from the National Institute of Mental Health. Her articles have appeared in Harper's, Mother Jones, and Psychology Today, among others. She lives in San Francisco with her husband, the writer Adam Hochschild.

(Publisher Provided) Arlie Russell Hochschild, Hochschild was a Professor of Sociology and directed the Center for Working Families at the University of California, Berkeley. She married writer Adam Hochschild, and they had two sons. She has been a Lang Visiting Professor of Social Change at Swarthmore College and a Fulbright Scholar at the Center for Development Studies in Trivandrum, Kerala, India.

She has written articles that have appeared in scholarly journals as well as Harper's, Mother Jones, and The New York Times Magazine. She has received awards from the Fulbright, Guggenheim and Alfred P. Sloan foundations and from the National Institute of Public Health.

Hochschild is the author of "The Second Shift," The Managed Heart," and "The Time Bind." She believed that women moving into the workforce have not been accompanied by changes in the workplace, and the issues of daycare and the role of men at home have caused tension within the family.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

Hochschild (The Outsourced Self), a sociologist and UC-Berkeley professor emerita, brings her expertise to American politics, addressing today's conservative movement and the ever-widening gap between right and left. Hochschild contends that current thinking neglects the importance of emotion in politics. Though touching lightly on objective causes, she goes searching primarily for what she names the "deep story"-emotional truth. She focuses on a single group (the Tea Party), state (Louisiana), and issue (environmental pollution), opening her mind-and, crucially, her heart-to the way avowed conservatives tell their stories. Her deeply humble approach is refreshing and strengthens her research. Hochschild discovers attitudes and behaviors around key concepts such as work, honor, religion, welfare, and the environment that may surprise those with left-leaning politics. She intrigues, for example, by showing that what the left regards as prejudice, the right sees as release from imposed "feeling rules," and the "sympathy fatigue" that results. She skillfully invites liberal readers into the lives of Americans whose views they may have never seriously considered. After evaluating her conclusions and meeting her informants in these pages, it's hard to disagree that empathy is the best solution to stymied political and social discourse. Agent: Georges Borchardt, Georges Borchardt Inc. (Sept.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Table of Contents

Prefacep. ix
Part 1 The Great Paradox
1 Traveling to the Heartp. 3
2 "One Thing Good"p. 25
3 The Rememberersp. 39
4 The Candidatesp. 55
5 The "Least Resistant Personality"p. 73
Part 2 The Social Terrain
6 Industry: "The Buckle in America's Energy Belt"p. 85
7 The State: Governing the Market 4,000 Feet Belowp. 99
8 The Pulpit and the Press: "The Topic Doesn't Come Up"p. 117
Part 3 The Deep Story and the People in it
9 The Deep Storyp. 135
10 The Team Player: Loyalty Above Allp. 153
11 The Worshipper; Invisible Renunciationp. 169
12 The Cowboy: Stoicismp. 181
13 The Rebel: A Team Loyalist with a New Causep. 193
Part 4 Going National
14 The Fires of History: The 1860s and the 1960sp. 207
15 Strangers No Longer: The Power of Promisep. 221
16 "They Say There Are Beautiful Trees"p. 231
Acknowledgmentsp. 243
Appendix A The Researchp. 247
Appendix B Politics and Pollution: National Discoveries from ToxMapp. 251
Appendix C Fact-Checking Common Impressionsp. 255
Endnotesp. 263
Bibliographyp. 317
Indexp. 339