Cover image for If you can keep it : the forgotten promise of American liberty
Title:
If you can keep it : the forgotten promise of American liberty
Author:
Metaxas, Eric, author.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Viking, [2016]

©2016
Physical Description:
260 pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
Eric Metaxas offers a thrilling review of America's uniqueness, and a sobering reminder that America's greatness cannot continue unless people truly understand what their founding fathers meant for them to be. The book includes a stirring call-to-action for every American to understand the ideals behind the 'noble experiment in ordered liberty' that is America. It also paints a vivid picture of the tremendous fragility of that experiment and explains why that fragility has been dangerously forgotten - and in doing so it lays out our own responsibility to live those ideals and carry on those freedoms. Metaxas believes America is not a nation bounded by ethnic identity or geography, but rather by a radical and unprecedented idea, based upon liberty and freedom.
Language:
English
Contents:
The promise -- The idea of America -- The golden triangle of freedom -- "The wonder of the age" -- Venerating our heroes -- The importance of moral leaders -- "The almost chosen people" -- Loving America -- This is America.
ISBN:
9781101979983
Format :
Book

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JC585 .M566 2016 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

" If You Can Keep It is at once a thrilling review of America's uniqueness, and a sobering reminder that America's greatness cannot continue unless we truly understand what our founding fathers meant for us to be. The book includes a stirring call-to-action for every American to understand the ideals behind the onoble experiment in ordered libertyo that is America. It also paints a vivid picture of the tremendous fragility of that experiment and explains why that fragility has been dangerously forgotten:and in doing so it lays out our own responsibility to live those ideals and carry on those freedoms. Metaxas believes America is not a nation bounded by ethnic identity or geography, but rather by a radical and unprecedented idea, based upon liberty and freedom. It's time to reconnect to that idea before America loses the very foundation for what made it exceptional in the first place."


Author Notes

Eric Metaxas was born in New York City in 1963, and grew up in Danbury, Connecticut. He graduated from Yale University, where he edited the Yale Record, America's oldest college humor magazine.

He has written several biographies, including Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery and the New York Times bestseller, Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet. His latest book is entitled, If You Can Keep It: The Forgotten Promise of American Liberty.

He has also written over 30 children's books, including It's Time to Sleep, My Love and Squanto and the Miracle of Thanksgiving.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* In a goofy bobblehead of Nathan Hale, created by waggish Yale alums, Metaxas discerns a disturbing symptom of a cultural disease afflicting America. Evident in the myriad ways that many Americans now ignore or deprecate all that is noble and inspiring in their country's history, this disease greatly alarms Metaxas as a threat to the republic the American founders created two centuries ago. Readers willing to contemplate that threat will see how cultural amnesia has dramatically dimmed America's collective awareness that freedom depends ultimately on virtue. Once recognized not only by Americans such as Washington and Adams but also by European thinkers such as Montesquieu and Tocqueville, this relationship between liberty and virtue defines the center of an impassioned appeal for a renewed American patriotism. Anticipating pushback from readers who regard patriotism as an outmoded, even destructive, tribalism, Metaxas argues that a healthy patriotism will lift us out of narrow self-interest and motivate us to address our nation's still very real defects. And at a time of increasing secularism, Metaxas dares to affirm the enduring role of religion in fostering virtuous patriotism in a nation still bearing the formative marks of the Great Awakening. A bracing challenge to both do-your-own-thing liberals and free-market conservatives.--Christensen, Bryce Copyright 2016 Booklist


Library Journal Review

Metaxas's (Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy) book means to inspire readers to keep lit the flame of American liberty as established by the founders. The book is evangelical in nature, a love letter to old America and traditional liberties, which Metaxas argues are rapidly vanishing and in danger of becoming extinct within this generation. Each chapter cautions against forgetting America's constitutional and foundational roots and calls for self-governance and the return of the government to its proper role in society. The book's arguments are almost exclusively grounded in the 18th century and frame the original intent of the creation of America. Metaxas leans heavily on historical situations, speeches, figures, and art, but his argument suffers from the lack of a connection with a modern United States and the driving home of how these illustrations translate today. In that sense, the book is more historical than political, as the author's main point is that the American philosophy and history he outlines are important to the survival of the country, which he fears are in danger of being forgotten. Verdict The conservative Christian reader will find the book stirring, but others might find it too narrowly focused to be effective.-Laurel Tacoma, Strayer Univ. Lib., Washington, DC © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.