Cover image for Voice of freedom : Fannie Lou Hamer, spirit of the civil rights movement
Title:
Voice of freedom : Fannie Lou Hamer, spirit of the civil rights movement
Author:
Weatherford, Carole Boston, 1956- , author.
Publication Information:
Holland, Ohio : Dreamscape Media, LLLC, [2016]
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (approximately 34 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
The story of Fannie Lou Hamer, who was a champion of civil rights; despite fierce prejudice and abuse, from the 1950s until her death in 1977.
General Note:
"Read-a-long"--Container.

Cataloged from container.

Based on the 2016 Caldecot Honor book; 2016 Robert F. Sibert Honor book.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
003-008.
Added Corporate Author:
ISBN:
9781520016788
Format :
DVD

Available:*

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E185.97.H35 W43 2016V Juvenile DVD Open Shelf
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E185.97.H35 W43 2016V Juvenile DVD Popular Materials-Juvenile Video
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E185.97.H35 W43 2016V Juvenile DVD Audio Visual
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E185.97.H35 W43 2016V Juvenile DVD Audio Visual
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E185.97.H35 W43 2016V Juvenile DVD Audio Visual
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E185.97.H35 W43 2016V Juvenile DVD Audio Visual
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Summary

Summary

Despite fierce prejudice and abuse, even being beaten to within an inch of her life, Fannie Lou Hamer was a champion of civil rights from the 1950s until her death in 1977. Integral to the Freedom Summer of 1964, Ms. Hamer gave a speech at the Democratic National Convention that, despite President Johnson's interference, aired on national TV news and spurred the nation to support the Freedom Democrats. Based on the critically acclaimed 2016 Caldecott and Sibert Honor Book, Voice of Freedom celebrates Fannie Lou Hamer's life and legacy with a message of hope, determination, and strength.


Summary

The story of Fannie Lou Hamer, who was a champion of civil rights, despite fierce prejudice and abuse, from the 1950s until her death in 1977.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* In this stunning biography of Fannie Lou Hamer, we walk beside her through tears and smiles on a remarkable journey of resilience and determination that leaves us transformed. The narrative is organized into a sequence of free-verse poems that stand alone as successfully as they link together. They describe what it was like to begin life under Jim Crow oppression and emerge a national hero. We learn that she cared for her aging mother, married, and adopted children; that she was forcibly sterilized, arrested, beaten, and most important, remained an activist her entire life. Caldecott Honor winner Weatherford (Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People to Freedom, 2006) has rendered Hamer's voice so precisely that it is like sitting at her knee as she tells her story. Holmes' multimedia collages perfectly capture the essence of each poem. Like Hamer's life, the illustrations are filled with light, texture, movement, and darkness. They are both abstract and realistic, brilliantly juxtaposing gentle floral motifs with protest placards and Fannie Lou Hamer's face in bold relief. Ultimately, though this is Hamer's story, it includes the collaborative struggles of others with whom she worked and fought for a different America. Bold, unapologetic, and beautiful.--Chaudhri, Amina Copyright 2015 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-8-This iconographic video expands on Carole Boston Weatherford's exemplary picture book biography of Fannie Lou Hamer by adding narration and simple animation. Janina Edwards's spirited narration conveys the beauty of Weatherford's poetic text and convincingly voices Hamer's perspective. Born in poverty, Hamer became a powerful voice of the civil rights movement. Forced to leave school after the sixth grade, she was in her forties when she first learned of her right to vote. Though registering to vote cost her work and drew death threats, Hamer was undaunted. With her signature song "This Little Light of Mine," she rallied others to register and worked tirelessly on behalf of the poor and disenfranchised. Throughout her life, Hamer faced hardships, which are described with candor and sensitivity. In 1963, after she and other civil rights workers sought service at a whites-only café, she was jailed and brutally beaten. Hamer refused to give up hope, though. Ekua Holmes's exquisite collage art depicts Hamer in yellow, symbolic of her Mississippi Delta roots and resilience. The presentation lingers over details in the mixed-media collages: sunflower motifs, snippets of text, and maps on clothes. Folksy guitar and simple animations enliven the presentation: hands clap, heads nod, and a pick-up truck rumbles into view. VERDICT This well-crafted video is an excellent resource to supplement American history studies, especially the civil rights era. Hamer's inspiring life story should resonate with a wide audience.-Marilyn Taniguchi, Beverly Hills Public Library, CA © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.