Cover image for The last love song : a biography of Joan Didion
Title:
The last love song : a biography of Joan Didion
Author:
Daugherty, Tracy, author.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Unabridged.
Publication Information:
[Ashland, Oregon] : Blackstone Audio, Inc., [2015]

℗2015
Physical Description:
21 audio discs (26.5 hr.) : digital, CD audio ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
In The last love song, Tracy Daugherty, the critically acclaimed author of Hiding Man (a New York Times Notable book) and Just one catch, delves deep into the life of distinguished American author and journalist Joan Didion in this, the first printed biography published about her life. Joan Didion lived a life in the public and private eye with her late husband, writer John Gregory Dunne, whom she met while the two were working in New York City while Didion was at Vogue and Dunne was writing for Time. They became wildly successful writing partners when they moved to Los Angeles and co-wrote screenplays and adaptations together. Didion is well known for her literary journalistic style in both fiction and nonfiction. Some of her most notable work includes Slouching towards Bethlehem, Run River, and The year of magical thinking, a National Book Award winner shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize. Daugherty takes listeners on a journey back through time, following a young Didion in Sacramento through to her adult life as a writer. Daugherty interviews those who know and knew her personally while maintaining a respectful distance from the reclusive literary great.The Last Love Song reads like fiction; lifelong fans and listeners learning about Didion for the first time will be enthralled with this impressive tribute.
General Note:
Compact discs.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781504672351

9781504672337
Format :
Audiobook on CD

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
PS3554.I33 Z57 2015C Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
Searching...
Searching...
PS3554.I33 Z57 2015C Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

In The Last Love Song, Tracy Daugherty, the critically acclaimed author of Hiding Man (a New York Times Notable book) and Just One Catch, delves deep into the life of distinguished American author and journalist Joan Didion in this, the first printed biography published about her life.Joan Didion lived a life in the public and private eye with her late husband, writer John Gregory Dunne, whom she met while the two were working in New York City, when Didion was at Vogue and Dunne was writing for Time. They became wildly successful writing partners when they moved to Los Angeles and cowrote screenplays and adaptations together. Didion is well known for her literary journalistic style in both fiction and nonfiction. Some of her most notable work includes Slouching towards Bethlehem, Run River, and The Year of Magical Thinking, a National Book Award winner short-listed for the Pulitzer Prize. Daugherty takes listeners on a journey back through time, following a young Didion in Sacramento through to her adult life as a writer. Daugherty interviews those who know and knew her personally while maintaining a respectful distance from the reclusive literary great.The Last Love Song reads like fiction; lifelong fans and listeners learning about Didion for the first time will be enthralled with this impressive tribute.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* Joan Didion, a California-born descendant of pioneers, was five when her flinty mother handed her a pad of paper and suggested that she write instead of whine. This triggered a lifetime devotion to writing and reading that, coupled to a penchant for daring investigations, led to her becoming a defining voice in the New Journalism movement and a razor-sharp novelist. Didion whose books include her seismic first essay collection, Slouching toward Bethlehem (1968); the novel, The Last Thing He Wanted (1996); and her memoir, The Year of Magical Thinking (2005) chose not to participate in Daugherty's research. But that did not prevent this most literary of literary biographers (his previous subjects were Donald Barthelme and Joseph Heller) from gathering phenomenally vivid details pertaining to Didion's family history, army-brat childhood, positions at Mademoiselle and Vogue, most painful love affair, long marriage to John Gregory Dunne, complicated relationship with their adopted daughter, numerous nervy writing escapades, including screenwriting ventures, and stylish fame. In this engrossing biography of exceptional vibrancy, velocity, and perception, Daugherty astutely elucidates Didion's ever-evolving artistic explorations and political critiques as she interrogates the meaning and intelligibility of literature and life. He also portrays this intensely candid, searching writer as endlessly hardworking, brilliantly innovative, and as sensitive as a tuning fork or divining rod, trembling with the intensity of it all, perfect in pitch, stunning in revelation.--Seaman, Donna Copyright 2015 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Daugherty, author of the Donald Barthelme biography Hiding Man, offers a monumental, novelistic examination of Joan Didion's life and career. The book's impressively detailed attention to place, beginning with Didion's California origins, grounds Didion's development as both a fiction writer and a journalist who served as "our keenest observer of the chaos" of the 1960s and beyond. At times, Daugherty tries too hard to mimic Didion's own famously cool and elliptical style, as in the passages about her time in Hollywood, but he settles into confident, engrossing prose when focusing on Didion's literary achievements, from the prematurely world-weary early novels and the groundbreaking essays that cemented her fame to the "extremely political, icily angry" mature works and the heartbreaking late memoirs The Year of Magical Thinking and Blue Nights. Taking a loyal, often protective tone toward his (physically) "famously frail" subject, Daugherty crafts a complex, intricately shaded portrait of a woman also known for her inner toughness and intellectual rigor. This landmark work renders a nuanced analysis of a literary life, lauds Didion's indelible contributions to American literature and journalism (especially New Journalism), and documents a "style [that] has become the music of our time." 8-page b&w photo insert. (Aug.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

From the 1960s through the 1980s, Joan Didion, now 80, was the best recorder of America's traumas, arguably better than Norman Mailer, Hunter S. Thompson, Tom Wolfe, or any other New Journalist. Daugherty (distinguished professor of English and creative writing, Oregon State Univ.), who has penned biographies of Joseph Heller and Donald Barthelme, may be the ideal writer to chronicle her life and achievement. The one flaw that marred Just One Catch, his biography of Heller, was his excessive dwelling on trivia-but the approach works with Didion, whose critical vision is best captured obliquely, in fractured images that convey a feeling of unease without proof of its causes: the real narrative of the times is hidden behind appearance. Where Heller's genius lay in telling the wildest stories ever, Didion is something else completely, an alienated WASP (White Anglo-Saxon Protestant) from the far edge of the United States where fantasies replace honesty and the ugliness of power is conveniently elided. As Daugherty notes, Didion's sensibilities are wholly Californian, describing a land with no discernible past and no future worth saving. Everything is present. VERDICT A strong biography. Who won't want to read this "hot" book?-David Keymer, Modesto, CA © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.