Cover image for The world made new : why the Age of Exploration happened & how it changed the world
Title:
The world made new : why the Age of Exploration happened & how it changed the world
Author:
Aronson, Marc.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Washington, D.C. : National Geographic, [2007]

©2007
Physical Description:
64 pages : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 27 cm
Summary:
Describes how the discoveries made by the Europeans around the time of Columbus changed the world. National Geographic has always given readers the bigger picture of our world. Now The World Made New shows children the bigger context of American history. Written by award-winning children's author Marc Aronson and John W. Glenn, this innovative title will lead children through the causes and consequences of the defining age of exploration. Its unique approach will provide children with new ways of thinking about and learning from history, and instill a lasting sense of our country's past. The World Made New provides a detailed account of the charting of the New World and the long-term effects of America's march into history. The text uses primary sources to bring history to life and features evocative profiles of the major explorers of the age. The book is beautifully illustrated with full-color artwork, multiple-time lines, and six custom National Geographic maps. The text and layout combine to provide an enlightening overview of New World exploration, and outline the historical context for the discoveries that literally changed the world. The narrative carries young readers through this age of glorious, and sometimes inglorious, adventure. Follow the timeline of history unfolding; how the early colonies were established; how dissemination of products like the potato, tomato, tobacco, and corn made the Americas a major part of the new world economy; and how the Caribbean became a major trading hub.
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction -- Causes: Why was there an age of exploration? -- Europe sets sail: Religion -- Competition -- Wealth -- Glory -- Knowledge -- Empires of the Americas: Inca -- Aztec -- Lost city -- Trade -- What happened: Explorers -- Columbus and the new world -- Age of exploration -- Cortés -- Pizarro -- Cartier -- De Soto -- Drake -- Consequences: How the explorers changed the world -- World joined: Disease -- Plants & animals -- Population -- Dinner -- Global gold -- Migration -- Ideas -- Ways of living -- Conclusion -- Place-finder map -- Biographical dictionary -- Glossary -- Sources & web sites -- Index.
Reading Level:
IG 1100 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 7.6 2.0 117019.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 10. 6 Quiz: 43057.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780792264545

9780792269786
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

National Geographic has always given readers the bigger picture of our world. Now The World Made New shows children the bigger context of American history. Written by award-winning children's author Marc Aronson and John W. Glenn, this innovative title will lead children through the causes and consequences of the defining age of exploration. Its unique approach will provide children with new ways of thinking about and learning from history, and instill a lasting sense of our country's past.

The World Made New provides a detailed account of the charting of the New World and the long-term effects of America's march into history. The text uses primary sources to bring history to life and features evocative profiles of the major explorers of the age. The book is beautifully illustrated with full-color artwork, multiple-time lines, and six custom National Geographic maps. The text and layout combine to provide an enlightening overview of New World exploration, and outline the historical context for the discoveries that literally changed the world.

The narrative carries young readers through this age of glorious, and sometimes inglorious, adventure. Follow the timeline of history unfolding; how the early colonies were established; how dissemination of products like the potato, tomato, tobacco, and corn made the Americas a major part of the new world economy; and how the Caribbean became a major trading hub.


Author Notes

Marc Aronson is an award-winning author, editor, publisher, speaker, and historian. He holds a PhD in American History.

John W. Glenn is an editor and producer of illustrated nonfiction reference books for children and adults. He has a BA in history from the University of Chicago.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

This visually rich presentation challenges readers to see the year 1492 as the whole world, coming into contact with people, plants, animals, and even bacteria soon traveling back and forth among Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Setting the stage, the first section of the book introduces civilizations in the Americas and in Europe before Columbus' voyage. The middle section looks at significant European explorers between 1492 and 1586, introducing six explorers on double-page spreads that include brief texts, detailed time lines, excellent maps, and several well-captioned, period illustrations. The intriguing third section discusses the consequences of a world joined. In the conclusion, the authors challenge readers to imagine that to those living in the Americas in 1492, the arrival of Europeans was as startling as the sighting of space ships would be today. A large map, a biographical dictionary, lists of sources, and lists of recommended Web sites are appended. A fine addition to history collections, the book offers a welcome, global perspective on the Age of Exploration.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2007 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-This highly pictorial, readable overview provides significant depth of coverage to the melding aspects of the European discovery of the Western Hemisphere. "Causes" discusses the European explorers and American civilizations. The roles of religion, competition, wealth, and glory are considered, and the Aztec and Inca empires and the civilization of Cahokia are described, not as primitive societies but as burgeoning, complex social networks. Next, the "What Happened" section discusses Columbus's voyages and the campaigns of Cortes, Pizarro, Cartier, De Soto, and Drake. Finally, "Consequences" looks at diseases, plants and animals, mingling and elimination of populations, migration, the force gold exerted, and the spread of ideas and lifestyles. The illustrations, most in full color, make ample and appropriate use of period prints as well as contemporary illustrations and photographs. The result is a visual feast that fleshes out the slightly dry, but remarkably evenhanded, narrative. Time lines are used frequently in both the second and third chapters to delineate life events or the spread of diseases or animal populations, for example. A place-finder map and a biographical dictionary (with illustrations) complete this attractive overview. A step up from the more lighthearted coverage in Nancy Winslow Parker's Land Ho! (HarperCollins, 2001), it's an excellent starting point for students.-Ann Welton, Helen B. Stafford Elementary, Tacoma, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Introductionp. 4
Causes: Why Was There an Age of Exploration?p. 6
Europe Sets Sailp. 8
Religion
Competition
Wealth
Glory
Knowledge
Empires of the Americasp. 14
The Inca
The Aztec
The Lost City
Trade
What Happened: The Explorersp. 20
Columbus and the New Worldp. 22
The Age of Exploration
Cortes
Pizarro
Cartier
De Soto
Drake
Consequences: How the Explorers Changed the Worldp. 36
A World Joinedp. 38
Disease
Plants & Animals
Population
Dinner
Global-Gold
Migration
Ideas
Ways of Living
Conclusionp. 50
Place-finder Mapp. 52
Biographical Dictionaryp. 54
Glossaryp. 59
Sources & Web Sitesp. 60
Indexp. 62