Cover image for The anthropology of childhood : cherubs, chattel, changelings
Title:
The anthropology of childhood : cherubs, chattel, changelings
Author:
Lancy, David F.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Second edition.
Publication Information:
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2014.
Physical Description:
xiv, 533 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Summary:
"How are children raised in different cultures? What is the role of children in society? How are families and communities structured around them? Now available in a revised edition, this book sets out to answer these questions, and argues that our common understandings about children are narrowly culture-bound. Enriched with anecdotes from ethnography and the daily media, the book examines family structure, reproduction, profiles of children's caretakers within family or community, their treatment at different ages, their play, work, schooling, and transition to adulthood. The result is a nuanced and credible picture of childhood in different cultures, past and present. Organised developmentally, moving from infancy through to adolescence and early adulthood, this new edition reviews and catalogues the findings of over 100 years of anthropological scholarship dealing with childhood and adolescence, drawing on over 750 newly added sources, and engaging with newly emerging issues relevant to the world of childhood today"--
Language:
English
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: 1. Where do children come from?; 2. Valuing children; 3. To make a child; 4. It takes a village; 5. Making sense; 6. Of marbles and morals; 7. The chore curriculum; 8. Living in limbo; 9. Taming the autonomous learner; 10. Too little childhood? Too much?; References; Author index; Topic index; Society index.
ISBN:
9781107072664

9781107420984
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library GN482 .L36 2015 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

How are children raised in different cultures? What is the role of children in society? How are families and communities structured around them? Now available in a revised edition, this book sets out to answer these questions, and argues that our common understandings about children are narrowly culture-bound. Enriched with anecdotes from ethnography and the daily media, the book examines family structure, reproduction, profiles of children's caretakers within the family or community, their treatment at different ages, their play, work, schooling, and transition to adulthood. The result is a nuanced and credible picture of childhood in different cultures, past and present. Organised developmentally, moving from infancy through to adolescence and early adulthood, this new edition reviews and catalogues the findings of over 100 years of anthropological scholarship dealing with childhood and adolescence, drawing on over 750 newly added sources, and engaging with newly emerging issues relevant to the world of childhood today.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

This second edition of Lancy's The Anthropology of Childhood (1st ed., 2008) is an excellent addition to any library. It is written squarely in the anthropological tradition of comparison: between contemporary societies, between social and biological explanations, between the past and the present. As such, it effectively challenges all of these boundaries while still providing a model for comparison between neontocracies and gerontocracies. Although anchored in evolutionary approaches, the book does not stint on the ethnographic resources. In fact, its strength is its encyclopedic attention to the work of scholars (not just anthropologists) on childhood. This work will be useful for any of the disciplines concerned with studies of the young. Lancy (emer., anthropology, Utah State Univ.) includes attention to child labor, adoption and fosterage, schooling, play, gamesmanship, cognition and thought, apprenticeship, and street kids, and his coverage stretches from infancy to adolescence. Lancy intended this as a reference volume, and it is. The second edition has allowed him to flesh out topics and resources to make this a readable, comprehensive, and critical reference that will stand for some time. Graduates and undergraduates, faculty and researchers alike. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --Jan Newberry, University of Lethbridge


Table of Contents

1 Where do children come from?
2 Valuing children
3 To make a child
4 It takes a village
5 Making sense
6 Of marbles and morals
7 The chore curriculum
8 Living in limbo
9 Taming the autonomous learner
10 Too little childhood? Too much?
References
Author index
Topic index
Society index

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