Cover image for Hold me closer : the Tiny Cooper story : a musical in novel form (or, a novel in musical form)
Title:
Hold me closer : the Tiny Cooper story : a musical in novel form (or, a novel in musical form)
Author:
Levithan, David, author.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York, New York : Dutton Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA), LLC, [2015]
Physical Description:
200 pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
"Larger-than-life Tiny Cooper finally gets to tell his story, from his fabulous birth and childhood to his quest for true love and his infamous parade of ex-boyfriends, in the form of a musical he wrote"--
General Note:
Companion book to: Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green and David Levithan.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780525428848
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

TIME Magazine's Top Ten Children's Books of 2015

" Tiny Cooper stole our hearts ." -- Entertainment Weekly

Especially for those of us who ordinarily feel ignored, a spotlight is a circle of magic, with the strength to draw us from the darkness of our everyday lives.

Watch out, ex-boyfriends, and get out of the way, homophobic coaches. Tiny Cooper has something to say--and he's going to say it in song.
Filled with honesty, humor, and "big, lively, belty" musical numbers, Hold Me Closer is the no-holds-barred (and many-bars-held) entirety of the beloved musical first introduced in Will Grayson, Will Grayson , the award-winning bestseller by John Green and David Levithan.

Tiny Cooper is finally taking center stage . . . and the world will never be the same again.

"Tiny will have readers falling out of their chairs laughing . . . . It's big. It's gay. It's outrageous and hilarious." -- Kirkus Reviews

★"Levithan has turned in another star turn with a book that is witty, wise, and well worthy of an encore ." -- Booklist , starred review

★"Tiny's passion for composing a big, beautiful life and a big, beautiful show overflows in this thoroughly magical book." -- BCCB , starred review

★"Tiny Cooper . . . gets his own star turn." -- Publishers Weekly , starred review


Author Notes

David Levithan was born in 1972. He graduated from Brown University in 1994 and is a senior editor at Scholastic. He has written numerous books including Boy Meets Boy, The Realm of Possibility, Every Day, and Another Day.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* He's baaack: Tiny Cooper, the larger-than-life costar of Levithan and John Green's Will Grayson, Will Grayson (2010), claims center stage in the former's latest, which according to its title page is a musical in novel form (or, a novel in musical form). Either way, the book is presented as being a two-act script for Tiny's epic autobiographical musical, Hold Me Closer. Act 1 charts his childhood and struggle to come out to his family and friends, who are less than surprised by the revelation, seeing how Tiny is, as his friend Will once put it, the world's gayest person who is really, really large. With an outsize personality to match his physicality, Tiny is flamboyant and fabulous and, as we learn in act 2, also a hopeless romantic, to the tune of having fallen in love 18 times. (And, yes, all 18 of his exes put in an appearance.) The action is propelled by 25 songs with such titles as The Ballad of the Lesbian Babysitter, Oh! What a Big Gay Baby, and Summer of Gay. This is all as much fun as it sounds, though it has a serious side in its sober examination of the nature of love. Levithan has turned in another star turn with a book that is witty, wise, and well worthy of an encore. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: A new Levithan is big news, but add to it the sheen of being a John Green-related sequel and this ought to evaporate from shelves.--Cart, Michael Copyright 2015 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Tiny Cooper, the memorable best friend from Levithan and John Green's Will Grayson, Will Grayson, gets his own star turn in this companion volume, which contains the script and lyrics of the autobiographical musical he wrote and staged in the original novel. With stage directions from Tiny ("Like myself, this musical is meant to be loud and spectacular") and the lyrics to 25 ballads and showstoppers, the show opens (à la Matilda) with Tiny's birth: "He should not be wearing a diaper. Instead, the person who emerges should be the large, stylish Tiny Cooper that you will see for the next two acts." The musical charts the course of Tiny's life as the "big-boned and happily gay" child of wonderful, football-loving parents and his quest for true love ("Mama and Papa didn't know/ they were lighting the lamp/ the moment they sent me/ to Starstruck Drama Camp"). Though billed as a "musical novel," there is no sheet music yet written for Tiny's magnum opus. Levithan is hoping for a crowd-sourced soundtrack, encouraging amateur and professional composers to put music to his words. Broadway, are you listening? Ages 14-up. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 10 Up-Written as a two-act musical complete with stage directions and 25 provocatively titled songs, such as "The Ballad of the Lesbian Babysitter" and "Summer of Gay," this companion to John Green and Levithan's award-winning Will Grayson, Will Grayson (Dutton, 2010) shines a spotlight on the larger-than-life Tiny Cooper, who was born "big-boned and happily gay." Accepted by his supportive parents, Tiny suffers no angst over his sexual orientation, despite having to contend with schoolmate bullies and a homophobic coach. Phil, his straight BFF, offers advice through Tiny's unsuccessful relationships with 18 different boyfriends, helping him eventually to realize that love is painful but worth it. Replete with laugh-out-loud one-liners ("sort of like a gay dance club has opened on Sesame Street"), in-your-face language (faggot and the invented term dickstracting), and showcasing Will and Tiny's "onstage" kiss, this edgy, au courant novel tackles a potentially difficult subject head-on, while giving sound, if liberal, counsel on sexual issues for gays and straights alike. Its solid story line and realistic, "colorful" dialogue will appeal to high school readers. VERDICT A welcome addition to progressive library collections, this unapologetic gem will encourage teens' discussion of a sensitive topic and potentially broaden their understanding of the meaning of "tolerance."-Nancy Menaldi-Scanlan, formerly at LaSalle Academy, Providence, RI (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

AN INTRODUCTORY NOTE CHARACTERS MUSICAL NUMBERS ACT I ACT I, SCENE 1 It's a dark stage, and at first all you hear are murmurs, a heartbeat, and heavy breathing. Like, serious Lamaze. Then we see, in the middle of the stage, a large piece of paper showing two bare, spread legs, discreetly covered by a hospital sheet. The heartbeat gets louder. The breathing gets heavier and more frantic, like a dinosaur is sitting on Santa and tickling him at the same time. Finally, as it all crescendos, TINY COOPER comes into the world, crashing through the piece of paper and entering spectacularly onto the stage. We are not going for realism here. He should not be naked and covered with amniotic fluid. That's gross. He should not be wearing a diaper. He's not into that. Instead, the person who emerges should be the large, stylish Tiny Cooper that you will see for the next two acts. To delineate him from Tiny at other ages, you should have him wearing a button that says AGE: 0. Most babies come into the world crying or gasping or snotting. Not Tiny Cooper. He comes into the world singing. Cue: Opening chords of "I WAS BORN THIS WAY." This is a big, lively, belty number--because, let's face it, if Elphaba got to sing "Defying Gravity" at the start of Wicked , she'd be much, much happier throughout the entire show. Tiny has just fallen into the world--some would say he was pushed--and already he has a sense of who he is and what he's going to do. The music and the production value must reflect that. Sparkles, people. Lots of sparkles. Do not get stingy with the sparkles. The reason drag queens love them so much is that you can get them for cheap. TINY: Hello, my name is Tiny Cooper . . . what's yours? I've just been born and, man, it feels good! Cue music. ["I WAS BORN THIS WAY"] TINY: I was born this way, big-boned and happily gay. I was born this way, right here in the U.S. of A. It's pointless for you to try to pinpoint how I became so G-A-Y. From my very first swish inflection, the rainbow curved in my direction. I've got brown hair, big hips, and green, green eyes. And when I grow up I'm gonna make out with guys, guys, guys! Why try to hide it? What good would that do? I was born this way and if you don't like it that says enough about you. If you find it odd, take it up with God. Because who else do you say could make me shine this way? All God's children wear traveling shoes whether you've got flat feet or twinkle toes. I'm going to dance right into this life and keep dancing as it goes. I was born this way, big-boned and happily gay. I was born this way, right here in the U.S. of A. It's pointless for you to try to pinpoint how I became so G-A-Y. From my very first swish inflection, the rainbow curved in my direction. I've got genes that fit me well and a spirit all my own I was born this way-- The rest is a great unknown! Really belting now . I. was. born. this. way. And I love. the way. I. was. born. The rest is a great unknown. But I'm ready, oh yes, I'm ready to find my own! If anyone is going to object to this musical, they will have left the theater at this point. Which is fine. That means for the rest of the time, you'll have a crowd that really gets it. Tiny Cooper steps over to the side of the stage, confiding in the audience. The stage clears. The spotlight is on him. (You will need a very big spotlight.) A note on the spotlight: It should be very clear from the beginning that this is Tiny's special place. I know plenty of people--like my best friend, Will, and my most recent ex (also named Will; long story)--who want to stay as far away from the spotlight as possible. But there are those of us who draw our power from those electric moments when everyone is watching, everyone is listening, and there is the most perfect silence you can imagine, the entire room waiting to hear whatever you will say next. Especially for those of us who ordinarily feel ignored, a spotlight is a circle of magic, with the strength to draw us from the darkness of our everyday lives. The thing about a spotlight is that you have to step into it. You have to get onto that stage. I haven't been ready for a lot of things, but from early on, I was ready for this. TINY: I can't remember a time when I wasn't gay, although there were definitely times I realized it more than others. And I can't remember a time I wasn't huge--which pretty much erased hiding as an option. This was my normal--big and gay. I would have never thought there was anything unusual about it. Except that I didn't live alone on a dessert island. [ Misspelling intentional! ] No, there had to be other people around. And the reaction I got from some of them made me self-conscious. You don't think babies can hear you. But you're wrong. They can hear you. The spotlight returns to the center of the stage. TINY'S MOM is wheeling a rather large, somewhat garish pink baby carriage. TINY'S DAD is walking beside her. The CROWD is made up of neighbors, all of them nosy, many of them judgmental. As they sing "OH! WHAT A BIG GAY BABY!" you should get a sense that they are both intrigued and disturbed by having such a big gay baby in their midst. As for Mom and Dad--they are alright with having a big gay baby, but they're tired, because having a big gay baby takes a lot of work. Not just because he wants to dance all night and demands milk shakes from his mother pretty much every hour, but because of the endless questions from neighbors and the "guidance" of family members who seem to think Mom and Dad have control over how big or how gay their big gay baby is. Mom and Dad can no more make me straight than they can make me short. There's this thing called biology, and it's calling the shots. Mom and Dad realize this. Others do not. The tune here is an old-fashioned town-crowd melody--kind of like how the people from the town in The Music Man might sound if Harold Hill had brought an infant homosexual to town instead of wind instruments. ["OH! WHAT A BIG GAY BABY!"] CROWD: Oh! What a Big Gay Baby! He must weigh twenty pounds. Oh! What a Big Gay Baby! Why is he making those sounds? TINY ( makes baby disco sounds, sort of like a gay dance club has opened on Sesame Street ) CROWD: Oh! What a Big Gay Baby! Feeding him must be such work! Oh! What a Big Gay Baby! He only falls asleep to Björk! MOM AND DAD: Possibly maybe . . . Possibly maybe . . . CROWD: He prefers hot male nurses and cries at ugly purses. Has a booty and knows to shake it. Has a pacifier and loves to take it. Oh! What a Big Gay Baby! Bedazzle the diapers and order them large! Oh! What a Big Gay Baby! Pimp his crib the size of a barge! MOM AND DAD: Look at this Big Gay Baby of ours-- not something you read about in Dr. Spock. Look at our Big Gay Baby-- not what we were expecting when we were expecting. Hello, dear Big Gay Baby, you might have to run before you can walk. CROWD: Oh! What a Big Gay Baby! We're not really sure how we feel. MEN IN CROWD: Be a man, boy! Be a man! WOMEN IN CROWD: That's our plan, boy! That's our plan! CROWD: Oh! What a Big Gay Baby! Already the size of a giant T. rex. Oh! What a Big Gay Baby! So unimpressed by the opposite sex. He dances to show tunes and has cheeks round as full moons. We wish he'd show some respect, but with a Big Gay Baby, what can you ex-- MOM AND DAD (spoken): Shhh! He's sleeping! CROWD ( turning it into a lullaby ): Goodnight Sondheim, goodnight June. Goodnight faggot, goodnight room. Welcome, Big Gay Baby! You're going to find . . . it's a helluva world! ACT I, SCENE 2 Now Tiny is four. (If he's wearing a button, change it to AGE: 4. ) The carriage is wheeled offstage, and Mom and Dad return carrying a pew-like bench. They sit down on it, with Tiny in the middle. The chorus arranges itself behind them, in the formation of a church choir. Tiny looks a little uncomfortable between his parents. TINY: It wasn't very long before my parents introduced me to their religion. I was four, so I didn't know there was any possibility of questioning it. Plus, I wanted so much to fit in. I know that's the story of our whole lives, but it all starts here. More than anything else, we want to fit into our own families. DAD: Son, it's very important to me that you take this seriously. TINY: Yes, Dad. MOM: It's not to be questioned. This is how we were raised, and it's how we are going to raise you. It is very important to us. TINY: I understand, Mom. MOM AND DAD: Good. The music for "RELIGION" should be . . . well . . . religious. Hymnlike and intense, as if sung by a true church choir. It must be sung very seriously, as if we're in a house of worship. I mean, not in a Sister Act, gospel-choir sense--these are NOT nuns led by Whoopi Goldberg. They are from Illinois. And not the gospel parts of Illinois. We are deep in the suburbs here. Tiny looks slightly uncomfortable in the pew. ["RELIGION"] DAD, MOM, AND CHORUS: Every Sunday Every Sunday Every Sunday is our day for religion. Every Sunday Every Sunday Every Sunday we congregate and pray. Every Sunday Every Sunday Every Sunday is a visitation. Every Sunday Every Sunday Every Sunday we watch them play. A television is wheeled out in front of the Cooper family. Dad turns it on. They are basked in the glow of the game. All the chorus members take out Chicago Bears banners and foam #1 fingers and begin to wave them in a synchronized, still church-like way. As the song goes on, we should see Tiny getting more and more into it. DAD, MOM, AND CHORUS: Hail Mary Hail Mary Hail Mary . . . Pass! Godspeed Godspeed Godspeed . . . To the end zone! (Hymnlike, the chorus now splits into men and women, echoing each other.) WOMEN: Remember the Super Bowl Shuffle. MEN: Remember the Super Bowl Shuffle. WOMEN: In this land of plenty-- MEN: In this land of plenty-- WOMEN: --we won Super Bowl Twenty. MEN: --we won Super Bowl Twenty. Excerpted from Hold Me Closer: The Tiny Cooper Story by David Levithan All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.