Cover image for The family Romanov : murder, rebellion & the fall of Imperial Russia
Title:
The family Romanov : murder, rebellion & the fall of Imperial Russia
Author:
Fleming, Candace, author.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Schwartz & Wade Books, [2014]
Physical Description:
292 pages, 32 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps, genealogical table ; 25 cm
Summary:
From the acclaimed author of Amelia Lost and The Lincolns comes a heartrending narrative nonfiction page-turner--and a perfect resource for meeting Common Core standards. When Russia's last tsar, Nicholas II, inherited the throne in 1894, he was unprepared to do so. With their four daughters (including Anastasia) and only son, a hemophiliac, Nicholas and his reclusive wife, Alexandra, buried their heads in the sand, living a life of opulence as World War I raged outside their door and political unrest grew into the Russian Revolution. Deftly maneuvering between the lives of the Romanovs and the plight of Russia's peasants and urban workers--and their eventual uprising--Fleming offers up a fascinating portrait, complete with inserts featuring period photographs and compelling primary-source material that brings it all to life.
Language:
English
Contents:
Before you begin -- Russia 1903 -- Beyond the palace gates: peasant turned worker -- Before the storm -- "I dreamed that I was loved" -- Beyond the palace gates: a peasant boyhood -- "What a disappointment!" -- Beyond the palace gates: lullabies for peasant babies -- "A small family circle" -- Beyond the palace gates: another family circle -- Dark clouds gathering -- The year of nightmares -- Lenin, the Duma, and a mystic named Rasputin -- Beyond the palace gates: house no. 13 -- "Pig and filth" and family fun -- Beyond the palace gates: an occupation for workers' daughters -- Gathering clouds -- Three centuries of Romanovs -- Beyond the palace gates: a different kind of education for a different kind of boy -- The storm breaks -- "My God! My God! What madness!" -- In defense of mother Russia -- Beyond the palace gates: Vasily's diary -- The reign of Rasputin -- It all comes tumbling down -- Beyond the palace gates: molecule in a storm -- "Ye tyrants quake, your day is over" -- Beyond the palace gates: "ye tyrants quake, your day is over" -- Final days -- "Survivors of a shipwreck" -- Beyond the palace gates: the "Tsar's surprise party" -- Into Siberia -- Beyond the palace gates: swarming the palace -- The house of special purpose -- Deadly intent -- "The world will never know what has become of them" -- Beyond the palace gates: life under Lenin.
Reading Level:
Young adult

950 Lexile
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader 7.2

Accelerated Reader AR MG+ 7.2 12.0 167384.

Reading Counts RC High School 7.4 17 Quiz: 64123.
ISBN:
9780375867828

9780375967825
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Here is the riveting story of the Russian Revolution as it unfolded. When Russia's last tsar, Nicholas II, inherited the throne in 1894, he was unprepared to do so. With their four daughters (including Anastasia) and only son, a hemophiliac, Nicholas and his reclusive wife, Alexandra, buried their heads in the sand, living a life of opulence as World War I raged outside their door and political unrest grew.

Deftly maneuvering between the lives of the Romanovs and the plight of Russia's peasants-and their eventual uprising-Fleming offers up a fascinating portrait, complete with inserts featuring period photographs and compelling primary-source material that brings it all to life. History doesn't get more interesting than the story of the Romanovs.


Author Notes

Candace Fleming is the prolific and highly acclaimed author of numerous books for young adults and children, including the nonfiction titles The Lincolns- A Scrapbook Look at Abraham and Mary, winner of the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for Nonfiction; Amelia Lost- The Life and Disappearance of Amelia Earhart, a New York Times Notable Children's Book of the Year; and The Great and Only Barnum- The Tremendous, Stupendous Life of Showman P. T. Barnum, an ALA-YALSA Best Book for Young Adults. She lives in Oak Park, Illinois. Visit her at candacefleming.com.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* History comes to vivid life in Fleming's sweeping story of the dramatic decline and fall of the House of Romanov. Her account provides not only intimate portraits of Tsar Nicholas; his wife, Alexandra; and the five Romanov children, but it also offers a beautifully realized examination of the context of their lives Russia in a state of increasing social unrest and turmoil. The latter aspect is shown in part through generous excerpts from letters, diaries, memoirs, and more that are seamlessly interspersed throughout the narrative. All underscore the incredible disparity between the glittering lives of the Romanovs and the desperately impoverished ones of the peasant population. Instead of attempting to reform this, Nicholas simply refused to acknowledge its presence, rousing himself only long enough to order savage repression of the occasional uprising. Fleming shows that the hapless tsar was ill equipped to discharge his duties, increasingly relying on Alexandra for guidance; unfortunately, at the same time, she was increasingly reliant on the counsel of the evil monk Rasputin. The end, when it came, was swift and for the Romanovs, who were brutally murdered terrible. Compulsively readable, Fleming's artful work of narrative history is splendidly researched and documented. For readers who regard history as dull, Fleming's extraordinary book is proof positive that, on the contrary, it is endlessly fascinating, absorbing as any novel, and the stuff of an altogether memorable reading experience.--Cart, Michael Copyright 2010 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

This educational history geared to young adult readers explores the reversals of fortune that attended the Romanov family, from their reign as privileged rulers of 130 million Russians at the turn of the 20th century to their violent deaths at the hands of Bolshevik revolutionaries in 1918. Farr, who is primarily a stage actress, serves as the story's primary narrator and also voices the diary entries and personal vignettes of various Romanov family members. She manages to create sympathy for the insulated family, especially the children, though her voice also expresses appropriate frustration at times when Czar Nicholas either turned a deaf ear to the desperation of his subjects or aggressively countered their complaints with military brutality. Less successful are the audio production's various uncredited "Beyond the Palace Gates" performances, which feature stories from the lives of Russian peasants, WWI soldiers, or other observers. Several anonymous voices perform these parts, lending a disjointed feel to the narrative, and oddly reinforcing the class divisions inherent to the history itself. (July) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Starred Review. Gr 9 Up-Listeners need not have a background in Russian history to enjoy Fleming's account of the dramatic rise and fall of the last Russian royal family. Kimberley Farr, along with a cast of voice actors, reads stories of the opulence in the palace and the destitution-ultimately leading to revolution-in the streets. Differing from most Russian history targeted for this age group (which often feature the Grand Duchess Anastasia as the key or only player), Fleming makes a great effort to go deeper. Addressing everything from the relationship between Alexandra and Rasputin to the vivid description of the sheltered lives of the Romanov children, Fleming's expertly researched account is engaging. While targeted to young adults, this would hold great appeal to adults as well. Farr's narration combined with Fleming's brilliantly researched writing will surely provide sustenance for those seeking meaty, narrative nonfiction.-Mary Medinsky, Red Deer College, Alberta, Canada (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Before You Beginp. vii
Russia, 1903p. 1
Beyond the Palace Gates: Peasant Turned Workerp. 11
Part 1 Before the Storm
Chapter 1 "I Dreamed That I Was Loved"p. 17
Beyond the Palace Gates: A Peasant Boyhoodp. 23
Chapter 2 "What a Disappointment!"p. 35
Beyond the Palace Gates: Lullabies for Peasant Babiesp. 40
Chapter 3 "A Small Family Circle"p. 45
Beyond the Palace Gates: Another Family Circlep. 48
Part 2 Dark Clouds Gathering
Chapter 4 The Year of Nightmaresp. 59
Chapter 5 Lenin, the Duma, and a Mystic Named Rasputinp. 68
Beyond the Palace Gates: House No. 13p. 71
Chapter 6 "Pig and Filth" and Family Funp. 88
Beyond the Palace Gates: An Occupation for Workers' Daughtersp. 96
Chapter 7 Gathering Cloudsp. 100
Chapter 8 Three Centuries of Romanovsp. 113
Beyond the Palace Gates: A Different Kind of Education for a Different Kind of Boyp. 120
Part 3 The Storm Breaks
Chapter 9 "My God! My God! What Madness!"p. 125
Chapter 10 In Defense of Mother Russiap. 133
Beyond the Palace Gates: Vasily's Diaryp. 135
Chapter 11 "The Reign of Rasputin"p. 146
Chapter 12 It All Comes Tumbling Downp. 156
Beyond the Palace Gates: Molecule in a Stormp. 168
Chapter 13 "Ye Tyrants Quake, Your Day Is Over"p. 170
Beyond the Palace Gates: "Ye Tyrants Quake, Your Day Is Over"p. 177
Part 4 Final Days
Chapter 14 "Survivors of a Shipwreck"p. 181
Beyond the Palace Gates: The "Tsar's Surprise Party"p. 192
Chapter 15 Into Siberiap. 196
Beyond the Palace Gates: Swarming the Palacep. 202
Chapter 16 The House of Special Purposep. 215
Chapter 17 Deadly Intentp. 227
Chapter 18 "The World Will Never Know What Has Become of Them"p. 241
Beyond the Palace Gates: Life Under Leninp. 247
Acknowledgmentsp. 255
Bibliographyp. 256
The Romanovs Onlinep. 266
Notesp. 267
Indexp. 288