Cover image for How to read the solar system : a guide to the stars and planets
Title:
How to read the solar system : a guide to the stars and planets
Author:
North, Chris (Chris E.), author.
Edition:
First Pegasus Books hardcover edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Pegasus Books, 2015.

©2014
Physical Description:
320 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Summary:
The Solar System - so what is it? This book looks at all the major players, including our more familiar neighbours - the Sun, the planets and their moons - the occasional visitors to our planet - asteroids, meteors and comets - as well as distant stars and what might be beyond our Solar System - Earth Mark II?
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Contents:
What is the solar system? -- Ancient stargazers -- Celestial mechanics -- The sun -- Mercury -- Venus -- Earth and Moon -- Mars -- Jupiter -- Saturn -- Uranus and Neptune -- Asteroids and dwarf planets -- Comets -- One among many.
ISBN:
9781605986715
Format :
Book

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QB501.2 .N67 2015 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QB501.2 .N67 2015 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QB501.2 .N67 2015 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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QB501.2 .N67 2015 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QB501.2 .N67 2015 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QB501.2 .N67 2015 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QB501.2 .N67 2015 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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QB501.2 .N67 2015 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

What exactly is the solar system? We've all learned the basics at school but do we really understand what we are seeing in the night sky? Expert astronomers Chris North and Paul Abel, provide a fascinating guided tour of our Solar System and explain its many wonders.They look at all the major players, including our more familiar cosmic neighbors--the Sun, the planets and their moons--as well as the occasional visitors to our planet--asteroids, meteors and comets--in addition to distant stars and what might lie beyond our Solar System, including the mysterious Earth Mark II? North and Abel recount the history of how our Solar System came to be, and the myths that once shaped astronomy. Through their cogent explanations of the latest scientific discoveries, they reveal how any amateur astronomer can view and interpret the Solar System and enrich their understanding of our universe.


Reviews 3

Publisher's Weekly Review

North and Abel, hosts of the BBC's popular astronomy TV series, The Sky at Night, step into print with this highly accessible introduction to basic astronomy. The authors open with a romp through the history of the field, from the earliest recorded celestial observations, made in Bronze Age China, through the discoveries of the ancient Greeks, to the work of Renaissance scientists such as Copernicus, Kepler, and Galileo. The sun and planets of our solar system each receive individual attention (though Uranus and Neptune share a chapter), and subsequent sections offer brief introductions to asteroids, the Kuiper Belt, comets, and the ongoing search for exoplanets. The authors comprehensively cover all the basics, making this book a great primer for readers who are just getting started in their reading on the subject, and it includes a foreword by astronomer (and Queen guitarist) Dr. Brian May. Like The Sky at Night, this chatty, non-technical discussion is perfect for the armchair or budding astronomer who wants a bit of background and history spread widely across the field. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

From ancient stargazers to scientists at today's powerful orbiting and ground-based observatories, humanity has long been engrossed in the quest to observe and comprehend its own space in the universe. While technology has changed dramatically over the millennia, the drive to understand our planet's nearest neighbors remains as exhilarating as ever. Coauthors North (researcher, Cardiff Univ. Sch. of Physics and Astronomy) and Abel (copresenter, BBC's The Sky at Night; assistant director, Saturn Section of the British Astronomical Association) provide amateur astronomers with the latest and greatest advances in the field that will enable them to explore the cosmic neighborhood on their own. Beginning with a brief historical overview of scientific observation and celestial mechanics, the authors then take readers on an enlightening tour of the solar system, from the Sun to Neptune, before turning to other objects, including asteroids, comets, and dwarf planets (where you will find Pluto). Individual chapters contain discussions of historical and current observations and intriguing notes about landscapes, mechanics, and orbiting moons. VERDICT This fascinating read supported by the latest research will engage and enchant. Recommended for anyone with an interest in astronomy and fans of the show Cosmos with Neil deGrasse Tyson. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

North (Cardiff Univ.) and Abel (Univ. of Leicester) are professional astronomers and hosts of the popular BBC TV program The Sky at Night, whose purpose is the same as that of this book: to educate the public about the excitement of astronomy. How to Read the Solar System is an entertaining and basic introduction to the planets and other objects in Earth's solar system. After a brief survey of the history of astronomy since the Greeks, a chapter on the sun sets the pace, addressing amateur viewing, ancient lore and observation, and professional astronomical research. Tips for amateur observation are sprinkled throughout the book. For example, instructions are given on how to construct and use a pinhole camera to observe sunspots. The black-and-white drawings and photographs helpfully illustrate key ideas. A six-page glossary and nine-page index are included, but the book lacks footnotes and endnotes. An excellent introduction to astronomy for general readers. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Undergraduate students and general readers. --Martha Dickinson, formerly, Maine Maritime Academy