Cover image for Flowers are calling
Title:
Flowers are calling
Author:
Gray, Rita, author.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, [2015]
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 21 x 29 cm
Summary:
Rhyming text explores the wonders of natural cooperation between flowers and the animals and insects of the forest.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.7 0.5 173940.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780544340121
Format :
Book

Available:*

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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Flowers are calling to all the animals of the forest, "Drink me!"--but it's the pollinators who feast on their nectar. In rhyming poetic form and with luminous artwork, this book shows us the marvel of natural cooperation between plants, animals, and insects as they each play their part in the forest's cycle of life.


Author Notes

Rita Gray is the author of several acclaimed picture books for children. She lives with her family in New York City. Visit her website at www.ritagrayreads.com .  Kenard Pak lives in San Francisco, where he works as an illustrator. He is also an animator for DreamWorks Animation. Visit his website at www.pandagun.com .


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Beautifully subdued watercolor and digital media illustrations, at times reminiscent of Jon Klassen's work, will draw readers into the text about the symbiotic relationship between flowers and their pollinators. In three sections, three nonpollinating animals are named, usually in rhyming couplets, but then rejected and replaced by three pollinators. Flowers are calling a desert deer. No, not a deer He can't even get near. They're calling a nectar bat to flap over here. Following is information on three featured plants: Cardon Cactus Lesser long-nosed bats have long tongues that can reach the nectar deep inside the bell-shaped flowers of the cardon cactus. These cactus flowers unfurl for just one short night. Not all the rhymes scan well, but they do not detract from the text successfully conveying information about each of the nine plants, animals, and insects and their reciprocal relationships. The importance of shape, smell, color, and pattern of flowers and other plant data is contained in two concluding sections titled Look at a Flower What Do You See? and Would You Believe --Owen, Maryann Copyright 2015 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

The team behind Have You Heard the Nesting Bird? returns to explore the way flowers seem to "call" to certain pollinator species in order to propagate. Gray's rhymes use poetic red herrings of a sort to engage readers: "Flowers are calling a desert deer./ No, not a deer! He can't even get near./ They're calling a nectar bat to flap over here." Pak's digitally altered watercolors capture a wide range of flora and fauna, from delicate Queen Anne's lace to pale moonflowers that attract moths by night. It's a sophisticated blend of scientific information and artistry. Ages 4-8. Author's agent: Fiona Kenshole, Transatlantic Literary Agency. Illustrator's agent: Kirsten Hall, Catbird Productions. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.