Cover image for My three best friends and me, Zulay
Title:
My three best friends and me, Zulay
Author:
Best, Cari, author.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Farrar Straus Giroux, 2015.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
"Zulay is a blind girl who longs to be able to run in the race on field and track day at her school"--
General Note:
"Margaret Ferguson books."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
Elementary Grade.
ISBN:
9780374388195
Format :
Book

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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

Zulay and her three best friends are all in the same first grade class and study the same things, even though Zulay is blind. When their teacher asks her students what activity they want to do on Field Day, Zulay surprises everyone when she says she wants to run a race. With the help of a special aide and the support of her friends, Zulay does just that.


Author Notes

Cari Best has written many award-winning picture books, including Sally Jean, the Bicycle Queen , a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year; Are You Going to Be Good? , a Parents' Choice Award Winner; and, most recently, Beatrice Spells Some Lulus and Learns to Write a Letter . Ms. Best lives in Weston, Connecticut.

Vanessa Brantley-Newton is the writer and/or illustrator of many picture books, including One Love , based on the Bob Marley song. Ms. Newton lives in Charlotte, North Carolina.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

A blind, African-American first grader named Zulay candidly shares her aspirations and frustrations in this frank, encouraging story. Best adeptly portrays Zulay as a rounded, complex character, not just a spokesperson-she's good at math; loves to sing, dance, and be silly with her friends; and enjoys typing on her Brailler. Zulay is honest about feeling self-conscious ("I don't like when I hear my name sticking out there by itself," she says when she has to work with an aide, instead of joining her classmates for gym) and annoyed about learning to use the fold-up white cane, something she feels makes her stick out. Best's prose and Brantley-Newton's digital images exude warmth and empathy as they build to a triumphant conclusion that has Zulay working hard to prepare for a Field Day race. Ages 4-8. Illustrator's agent: Lori Nowicki, Painted Words. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-Best friends Maya, Nancy, Chyng, and Zulay laugh and sing and help one another with homework. When their first-grade teacher, Ms. Seeger, surprises them with an announcement about an upcoming field day, excitement fills the air. The 22 students each announces the events they want to compete in, and Zulay surprises everyone when she says she would like to run in the race. Zulay is blind and just learning to use her cane. She does not like to stick out among her peers but is determined to accomplish her goal. With the help of a teacher, Zulay works hard to overcome the odds and achieve success. This story is inspiring and inclusive. Zulay is portrayed as a happy, well-rounded first grader, and the author pays the perfect amount of attention to her special needs. Young readers will understand the challenges that Zulay faces in getting around but also that all students face unique challenges. Bright, colorful illustrations on a clean white backdrop are crisp and clear and mesh seamlessly with the text. This story is a great read-aloud for younger students due to the length of the text, but just right as independent reading for second and third graders. This picture book is a great way to continue building diverse library collections for all readers.-Amy Shepherd, St. Anne's Episcopal School, Middleton, DE (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.