Cover image for Mr. Squirrel and the moon
Title:
Mr. Squirrel and the moon
Author:
Meschenmoser, Sebastian., author, illustrator.
Uniform Title:
Herr Eichhorn und der Mond. English
Publication Information:
New York : NorthSouth Books Inc., 2015.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : illustrations ; 23 x 29 cm
Summary:
"When Mr. Squirrel awakens to find that the moon has landed on his tree, he frantically tries to get rid of it before someone suspects him of stealing it and puts him in jail. But when he rolls the moon off of his tree, it gets stuck on Mrs. Hedgehog's bristles and when the billy-goat arrives and butts it with his horns....Will the moon ever be the same again? Sebastian Meschenmoser's hilarious illustrations and rollicking tale will be a bedtime favorite"--Amazon.com.
General Note:
First published in Germany under the title Herr Eichhorn und der Mond.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780735841567
Format :
Book

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Central Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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Audubon Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Winter 2015 Top Ten IndieNext Pick When Mr. Squirrel awakens to find that the moon has landed on his tree, he frantically tries to get rid of it before someone suspects him of stealing it and puts him in jail. But when he rolls the moon off of his tree, it's gets stuck on Mrs. Hedgehog's bristles and when the billy-goat arrives and butts it with his horns . . . Will the moon ever be the same again? Sebastian Meschenmoser's hilarious illustrations and rollicking tale will be a bedtime favorite.


Author Notes

Sebastian Meschenmoser was born in Frankfurt am Main in 1980. He has been studying Fine Arts in Mainz since 2001.With ,,Learning how to Fly" he published his first book with Esslinger in 2005. This very special gift book has received a lot of attention in


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

When a wheel of cheese lands on a branch outside Mr. Squirrel's home, he concludes it is the moon and that he will be imprisoned for stealing it. He attempts to dispose of the evidence by pushing it to the ground, where it lands on Mrs. Hedgehog. Soon other creatures become involved in the caper: Billy Goat spears it with his horns, bees mistake it for a hive, and some mice make a good meal of it. Finally, they catapult the crescent-shaped remains into the sky, where it becomes the moon. Translated from the original German, Meschenmoser's minimalist text provides only a bare-bones story, while the illustrations black-and-white pencil sketches accented in color with a bright yellow cheese fill in the details. Some highlights: the two spreads leading up to the title page revealing the disc is really cheese, and a black-and-white scene depicting Mr. Squirrel (and his friends) sharing a jail cell with a solitary prisoner. This makes a good choice for story hours or one-on-one sharing.--Weisman, Kay Copyright 2015 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Meschenmoser's story opens as a wheel of yellow cheese rolls off its wagon, hurtles off a cliff, and lands on a branch outside a squirrel's home. In the same sort of misidentification that drove Meschenmoser's Waiting for Winter, Mr. Squirrel concludes that the yellow cheese is the moon, and worries that he'll be fingered as its thief: "He'd be arrested and thrown in prison." A silent spread pictures the squirrel's fears with mordant humor as he appears in a small prison uniform, reflecting remorsefully as his human cellmate works on a piece of embroidery. (Further inspection reveals a miniature squirrel-sized latrine along the back wall.) The action heats up as a hedgehog, billy goat, and crew of mice join the fray (further crowding the imaginary prison cell of the conscience-stricken squirrel) until they can work out how to put the cheese back where it belongs. Meschenmoser's soft pencil portraits of the squirrel's inner fears teeter right at the sweet spot between anguish and humor. The story's deepest pleasure comes from the contrast between its ever-more-ridiculous scenarios and the artist's solemn, classically proportioned drafting style. Ages 4-8. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-This story starts before the title page and won't make sense if readers skip these early pages. Wordless drawings depict a large wheel of cheese falling from a farmer's cart and rolling off a cliff. The next morning, Mr. Squirrel discovers what he thinks is the moon perched on a branch of his tree. Worried that he might be arrested if someone finds him with what must surely be a stolen item, he gets rid of the moon by pushing it off the branch. Unfortunately, it lands on Mrs. Hedgehog and gets stuck on her back. A billy goat comes along and butts the moon with his horns and charges a tree. The goat spends the night attached to both the moon and the tree with the hedgehog still dangling. The next morning some bees and mice, obviously realizing the round yellow object is edible, munch away until it is just a sliver. The goat and hedgehog are freed, and the animals slingshot the moon back into the sky where they hope it will recover its original shape. The story is told in a wry, matter-of-fact style. The illustrations are mostly black and white sketches that contrast with the bright yellow cheese/moon. The book's droll sense of humor is marred, however, by three spreads that presumably come from the worried squirrel's imagination. These dark pictures of a man in jail are downright creepy and ruin the playful tone of the story. Readers should use their judgment when sharing this book with children.-Martha Simpson, Stratford Library Association, CT (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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