Cover image for The hunger of the wolf : a novel
Title:
The hunger of the wolf : a novel
Author:
Marche, Stephen, author.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Simon & Schuster, 2015.
Physical Description:
253 pages ; 24 cm
Summary:
A "body [found] in the snow is that of Ben Wylie, the heir to America's second-wealthiest business dynasty, and it is found in a remote patch of northern Canada. Far away, in post-crash New York, Jamie Cabot, the son of the Wylie family's housekeepers, must figure out how and why Ben died. He knows the answer lies in the tortured history of the Wylie family, who over three generations built up their massive holdings into several billion dollars' worth of real estate, oil, and information systems despite a terrible family secret they must keep from the world"--
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781476730813
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library FICTION Adult Fiction Central Library
Searching...
Kenmore Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Orchard Park Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Julia Boyer Reinstein Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Hunters found his body naked in the snow. So begins this breakout book from Stephen Marche, the provocativeEsquirecolumnist and regular contributor to The Atlantic, whose last work of fiction was described by the New York Times Book Reviewas "maybe the most exciting mash-up of literary genres since David Mitchell's Cloud Atlas." The body in the snow is that of Ben Wylie, the heir to America's second-wealthiest business dynasty, and it is found in a remote patch of northern Canada. Far away, in post-crash New York, Jamie Cabot, the son of the Wylie family's housekeepers, must figure out how and why Ben died. He knows the answer lies in the tortured history of the Wylie family, who over three generations built up their massive holdings into several billion dollars' worth of real estate, oil, and information systems despite a terrible family secret they must keep from the world. The threads of the Wylie men's destinies, both financial and supernatural, lead twistingly but inevitably to the naked body in the snow and a final, chilling revelation.

The Hunger of the Wolf is a novel about what it means to be a man in the world of money. It is a story of fathers and sons, about secrets that are kept within families, and about the cost of the tension between the public face and the private soul. Spanning from the mills of Depression-era Pittsburgh to the Swinging London of the 1960s, from desolate Alberta to the factories of present-day China, it is a bold and breathtakingly ambitious work of fiction that uses the story of a single family to capture the way we live now.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* Ben Wylie, the eighth richest man in the world, is found naked and dead in the snow in northern Alberta. Journalist Jamie Cabot, whose parents were caretakers of the Wylie family cabin in Alberta, wants to know why. So begins a family saga about three generations of Wylies, who built an empire. But that sells the novel far too short. Marche has created a stunning, evocative, and impressionistic account of the ascent of wealth in the twentieth century, from a grim, turn-of-the-century Pennsylvania steel town to the economic collapse of 2008. That Dale Wylie, founder of the empire, and his successors become werewolves once a month is initially jarring, but readers already captured by Marche's narrative will keep the faith. Dale's success isn't genius. It's simple doggedness. Buy a newspaper with borrowed money, cut costs by half. Repeat. Retreat to a cage in the basement once a month and howl. Buy a radio station. Repeat. Through Cabot, Marche comments slyly on the differences between the merely rich and the 0.0000001 percent and on Manhattan's penchant for seemingly monthly zeitgeist shifts. As an omniscient author, he brilliantly and sometimes gnomicly summarizes whole decades (e.g., the Quaalude loucheness of the seventies). The Hunger of the Wolf could be Marche's breakthrough novel.--Gaughan, Thomas Copyright 2014 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

The nature of family bonds and wealth are at the heart of this spellbinding tale from Marche (Love and the Mess We're In). Jamie Cabot grew up in isolated northern Alberta, Canada, where his parents work for the elusive and enigmatic Wylie family, one of the richest business dynasties in the world. When Ben Wylie, an extremely wealthy man, is found naked and dead in the frigid Alberta snow, Jamie's curiosity spikes, and he becomes determined to uncover the secret behind the Wylie family. From the Canadian hinterlands to New York City society life, Jamie seeks contact with the Wylies. Despite the novel's account of their dramatic accumulation of a peerless fortune, the Wylies remain mysterious-not only to Jamie and to the public, but also to one another. No word is out of place in this taut multigenerational tale, which takes some enjoyable supernatural turns-readers will be just as driven as Jamie to discover the mystery at the heart of the Wylie's legacy. Agent: P.J. Mark, Janklow & Nesbit. (Feb.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

Marche's latest (Shining at the Bottom of the Sea) tells an epic, Gatsby-esque tale of a financial dynasty and adds a touch of the supernatural, with uneven results. When Ben Wylie, the heir to a multibillion-dollar empire, is found lying dead in the Canadian snow, Jamie Cabot, a writer with childhood ties to the Wylies, tries to uncover the truth. He traces the history of WylieCorp, beginning with Dale, whose business of buying up radio stations and newspapers during the height of the Great Depression laid the groundwork for his son George, who took the company international. The story of the self-made Wylies would seem to be a triumph of ambitious capitalism, but they harbor a dangerous secret: for three days a month, the Wylie men cage themselves in the basement where they turn into werewolves, howling themselves into exhaustion. The revelation of how Ben died is the glum culmination to a family saga devoid of nearly any joy. VERDICT As one would expect from the author of Esquire's monthly column A Thousand Words About Our Culture, Marche's observations on the growing hollowness of the moneyed class are trenchant and timely, but the strained metaphor of capitalists-as-wild-beasts feels out of place. An immaculately written but unsatisfying effort.-Michael Pucci, South Orange P.L., NJ (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Hunger of the Wolf ONE Excerpted from The Hunger of the Wolf: A Novel by Stephen Marche All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Google Preview