Cover image for Silence the dead
Title:
Silence the dead
Author:
Fredrickson, Jack, author.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Sutton, Surrey, England : Severn House, 2014.
Physical Description:
280 pages ; 23 cm
Summary:
The new mayor of a small town in Illinois unearths a series of devastating secrets when he re-opens a 30-year-old murder investigation 17-year-old Betty Jo Dean was abducted and murdered thirty years ago. It took two days to find her body. She was found, fully dressed apart from her slacks, beneath a gnarled, stunted tree, shot in the back of the head. No one was ever charged with her murder. Now, following an appeal from one of his constituents, Mayor Mac Bassett has called for the case to be re-opened. But when the body is exhumed, it is revealed that the skull, found loose in the coffin, does not belong to Betty Jo. If Mac could discover why Betty Jo's head was taken, he would be one step closer to finding out who killed her. But no one in the small town of Grand Point is talking. Sheriffs, doctors, medical examiners: everyone seems to be warning Mac off. And then people start dying.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780727884350

9781847515438
Format :
Book

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Material Type
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Status
Central Library FICTION Adult Fiction Popular Materials-Mystery
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Summary

Summary

The new mayor of a small town in Illinois unearths a series of devastating secrets when he re-opens a 30-year-old murder investigation

17-year-old Betty Jo Dean was abducted and murdered thirty years ago. It took two days to find her body. She was found, fully dressed apart from her slacks, beneath a gnarled, stunted tree, shot in the back of the head. No one was ever charged with her murder.

Now, following an appeal from one of his constituents, Mayor Mac Bassett has called for the case to be re-opened. But when the body is exhumed, it is revealed that the skull, found loose in the coffin, does not belong to Betty Jo.

If Mac could discover why Betty Jo's head was taken, he would be one step closer to finding out who killed her. But no one in the small town of Grand Point is talking. Sheriffs, doctors, medical examiners: everyone seems to be warning Mac off. And then people start dying ...


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Fredrickson has created this powerful novel by freshening up genre standbys. First is the murder that surfaces years after everyone thought the case was buried with the victim. Then there are the old boys who were around then and turn strange when anyone starts asking questions. And we have the hero, someone with personal and professional problems that he must solve at the same time as he resurrects the cold case. For reasons we can't suss out until the last few pages, small-town mayor Mac Bassett slights his failing restaurant to obsess over the killing of a high-school girl three decades ago. He learns that a reporter who covered the story was driven mad, a newspaper intern was killed in a suspicious car crash, and a bartender who heard too much drowned. The body count starts up again when the questions do. Fredrickson enriches his story by peopling it with sassy characters even the jerks are people, not types. The revelations will not shock readers familiar with the genre. But after the ending comes another ending, this one with terrific force.--Crinklaw, Don Copyright 2010 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

The opening of this solid whodunit, based on a real-life murder case, is certainly an attention getter. When the authorities exhume the corpse of Betty Jo Dean, who was shot to death in Grand Point, Ill., decades earlier at the age of 17, they see that she was buried only in her underwear. Grand Point's mayor, Mac Bassett, who "had imagined all sorts of horrors," insists that the fleshless, loose skull in the coffin is not Betty Jo's. Flash back to 1982: on the last night of her life, Betty Jo hooks up with a new beau. The following day, after Betty Jo has gone missing and the beau is found dead, Chicago reporter Jonah Ridl arrives in Grand Point to investigate, only to learn that local law enforcement is concealing the truth. In the present, Bassett discovers that the cover-up is still active-and deadly. The ending is a bit of a letdown, but Fredrickson (The Dead Caller from Chicago and three other Dek Elstrom mysteries) does a decent job of portraying smalltown despair. Agent: John Silbersack, Trident Media Group. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


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