Cover image for The whispering swarm
Title:
The whispering swarm
Author:
Moorcock, Michael, 1939- , author.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Tom Doherty Associates, LLC, 2015.
Physical Description:
480 pages ; 24 cm.
Summary:
Back in the Thirteenth Century, King Henry III granted a plot of land in the heart of London to an order of Friars known as the Carmelites. In return, they entered into a compact with God to guard a holy object. This sanctuary became a refuge for many of ill-repute, as the Friars cast no judgment and took in all who were in search of solace. Known as Alsatia, it did not suffer like the rest of the world. No Plague affected it. No Great Fire burned it. No Blitz destroyed it. Within its walls lies a secret to existence--one that has been kept since the dawn of time--a bevy of creation, where reality and romance, life and death, imaginary and real share the same world. One young man's entrance into this realm sends a shockwave of chaos through time. What lies at the center of this sacred realm is threatened for the first time in human existence.
General Note:
"A Tor book."
Language:
English
Corporate Subject:
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780765324771
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library FICTION Adult Fiction Central Library
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Almost anyone who has read or written Science Fiction or fantasy has been inspired by the work of Michael Moorcock. His literary flair and grand sense of adventure have been evident since his controversial first novel Behold the Man , through the stories and novels featuring his most famous character, Elric of Melniboné, to his fantasy masterpiece, Gloriana , winner of both the Campbell Memorial and World Fantasy, awards for best novel. Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore, and Michael Chabon all cite Moorcock as a major influence; as editor of New Worlds magazine, he helped launch the careers of many of his contemporaries, including Harlan Ellison, Philip K. Dick, and J. G. Ballard.

Tor Books now proudly presents Moorcock's first independent novel in nine years, a tale both fantastical and autobiographical, a celebration of London and what it meant to be young there in the years after World War II. The Whispering Swarm is the first in a trilogy that will follow a young man named Michael as he simultaneously discovers himself and a secret realm hidden deep in the heart of London.


Author Notes

Michael Moorcock, 1939 - Writer Michael Moorcock was born December 18, 1939 in Mitcham, Surrey, England. Moorcock was the editor of the juvenile magazine Tarzan Adventures from 1956-58, an editor and writer for the Sexton Blake Library and for comic strips and children's annuals from 1959-61, an editor and pamphleteer for Liberal Party in 1962, and became editor and publisher for the science fiction magazine New Worlds in 1964. He has worked as a singer-guitarist, has worked with the rock bands Hawkwind and Blue Oyster Cult and is a member of the rock band Michael Moorcock and the Deep Fix.

Moorcock's writing covers a wide range of science fiction and fantasy genres. "The Chronicles of Castle Brass" was a sword and sorcery novel, and "Breakfast in the Ruins: A Novel of Inhumanity" uses the character Karl Glogauer as a different person in different times. Karl participates in the political violence of the French Revolution, the Paris Commune, and a Nazi concentration camp. Moorcock also wrote books and stories that featured the character Jerry Cornelius, who had no consistent character or appearance. "The Condition of Muzak" completed the initial Jerry Cornelius tetralogy and won Guardian Literary Prize in 1977.

"Byzantium Endures" and "The Laughter of Carthage" are two autobiographical novels of the Russian emigre Colonel Pyat and were the closest Moorcock came to conventional literary fiction. "Byzantium Endures" focuses on the first twenty years of Pyat's life and tells of his role in the Russian revolution. Pyat survives the revolution and the subsequent civil war by working first for one side and then another. "The Laughter of Carthage" covers Pyat's life from 1920-1924 telling of his escape from Communist Russia and his travels in Europe and America. It's a sweeping picture of the world during the 1920's because it takes the character from living in Constantinople to Hollywood. Moorcock returned to the New Wave style in "Blood: A Southern Fantasy" (1994) and combined mainstream fiction with fantasy in "The Brothel of Rosenstrasse," which is set in the imaginary city of Mirenburg.

MoorCock won the 1967 Nebula Award for Behold the Man and the 1979 World Fantasy Award for his novel, Gloriana. (Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

Moorcock (the Elric saga) returns from a long hiatus with a new novel that melds autobiography and "secret world" fantasy. The result isn't always perfect, but it is an absorbing look at the history of a genre legend, avoiding most of the postmodern clichés the concept implies. The novel begins with Moorcock's adolescence and young adult years, as he meets fellow nascent writers like Barrington Bayley and John Brunner and takes over Tarzan Adventures before he's even 17. But in this alternate history, young Moorcock meets the seemingly out-of-touch Friar Isidore, and their friendship leads to the hidden abbey of Alsacia, as well as assorted characters straight out of legend. Moorcock's fantastic adventures-cast against his own family and early romantic life-are entertaining enough, but it's really the stealthy autobiography disguised as adventure that drives the story (a section in which he admits that he might have pushed some new writers "where they didn't want to go" stands out). Fantasy fans will enjoy the book on its well-polished merits, but those interested in the history of the fantasy genre will get the most out of it. Agent: Howard Morhaim, Howard Morhaim Literary Agency. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Google Preview