Cover image for This is Pollock
Title:
This is Pollock
Author:
Ingram, Catherine, author.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
London : Laurence King Publishing Ltd., 2014.
Physical Description:
80 pages : color illustrations ; 23 cm
Summary:
"In 1956, Time magazine referred to Pollock as 'Jack the Dripper'. His iconic paintings stretch out with the generosity and scale of America's Western landscape where the artist grew up. Pollock said that he painted 'out of his conscious': the cathartic dribbled paint reflected his troubled mind. This book traces Pollock's career and discusses how his loose, individual style was used as a political weapon in the Cold War, representing America as the free, democratic nation. Illustrations simplify the theory and reveal the hidden meaning behind the mesh of painted lines."--Amazon.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781780673462
Format :
Book

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Central Library ND237.P73 I53 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Audubon Library ND237.P73 I53 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Biography
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Clarence Library ND237.P73 I53 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Biography
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Clearfield Library ND237.P73 I53 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Biography
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Crane Branch Library ND237.P73 I53 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Biography
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East Aurora Library ND237.P73 I53 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Grand Island Library ND237.P73 I53 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Biography
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Hamburg Library ND237.P73 I53 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Biography
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Kenmore Library ND237.P73 I53 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Lancaster Library ND237.P73 I53 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library ND237.P73 I53 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Anna M. Reinstein Library ND237.P73 I53 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library ND237.P73 I53 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Biography
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Summary

Summary

In 1956 Time magazine referred to Pollock as "Jack the Dripper". His iconic paintings stretch out with the generosity and scale of America's Western landscape where the artist grew up. Pollock said that he painted "out of his conscious": the cathartic dribbled paint reflected his troubled mind.

This book traces Pollock's career and discusses how his loose, individual style was used as a political weapon in the Cold War, representing America as the free, democratic nation. Illustrations simplify the theory and reveal the hidden meaning behind the mesh of painted lines.

This title is appropriate for ages 14 and up


Author Notes

Catherine Ingram is a freelance art historian. She obtained a First Class Honours degree at Glasgow University, where she was a Honeyman scholar. After an MA in 19th-century art at the Courtauld Institute of Art, Catherine became a graduate scholar at Trinity College, Oxford. After finishing her D.Phil, she was made a Prize Fellow at Magdalen College, Oxford. Catherine has taught on the MA course at Christie's and lectured at Imperial College, teaching art history to undergraduate scientists.

A native of Scotland, Peter Arkle lives and works in New York. He creates illustrations for books, magazines, and ads for a wide range of clients, including Amnesty International,The New Yorker,The New York Times,The Guardian, andEsquire.


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

The third book in the series by freelance art historian Ingram is a concise account of the life of abstract expressionist Jackson -Pollock (1912-56). Ingram and Scottish illustrator Arkle portray their subject as a misunderstood victim of a fitful art world, addiction, depression, and other circumstances. The legendary "bad boy" stories about Pollock are not omitted; rather, -Ingram recaps and explains the artist's blunders in context, shedding light on some important details about his time, life, and personal affairs (including a formidable mother, an alcoholic father, and a clinical diagnosis of extreme introversion). The author's sensitive perspective is positively augmented by Arkle's youthful, graphic novel-like illustrations, which set this book apart from the many others about the too-brief existence of -Pollock. What the title is not is a naive dramatization. The erudite Ingram sticks to the facts while theorizing that politics and society played a role in both the rise and the downward spiral of the man. VERDICT A refreshing and honest book that implores readers to be sympathetic rather than disdainful of one of American's greatest painters. While historically accurate, theoretical, and critical, this work is not for those looking for dense art history, theory, or criticism.--Jennifer H. Krivickas, Univ. of -Cincinnati Lib. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Starred Review. Gr 10 Up-Ingram's eye-grabbing graphic-novel profiles convey each artist's life story and particular panache with a combo of witty narrative, vivacious illustrations, reproductions of pivotal artworks, and the occasional photo. The book design is superb: each volume features a pen-and-ink portrait of its subject on the front cover and a personal quote that imparts each man's essence on the back cover. Biographical highlights and astute and accessible discussions of artworks are woven into a tapestry of historical events, contemporary cultural trends, and art history context. Dali introduces the Spanish artist "known for his lavish lifestyle, his gravity-defying moustache and his bizarre art." A self-promoting megalomaniac, he made (and spent) millions and led an existence as surrealistic as his artistic oeuvre. Pollock strives to separate the artist's career from his famously "bad boy storyline" (he is well-known for drunken antics and public displays of bad behavior) and demonstrate how his "monumental drip paintings reflect a uniquely American vision." Warhol traces the artist's transformation from "awkward kid" to "avant-garde player" and shows how he utilized his keen eye for spotting cultural trends to elevate the ordinary into the extraordinary. Bright-colored comic book-style illustrations interpret and expand upon the texts with drama, humor, and insight. Eloquent, informative, and amusing, the series' urbane viewpoint and sometimes-titillating images make it best suited for more mature readers.-Joy Fleishhacker, School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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